PDA

View Full Version : From what career background do YOU come from?



sXeChris
December 22nd, 2010, 03:21 AM
So I'm going to college soon and I have a few questiosn for veteran Ubuntu contributors:

1. Did you major in Computer Science to acquire the skills you have to alter Linux systems? If so, is CS heavy on mathematics?

2. What type of job do you have at the moment?

3. If you could have done something differently what would it be?

Elfy
December 22nd, 2010, 06:44 PM
move to cafe

andymorton
December 22nd, 2010, 10:08 PM
Hi,

I'm a Zoology student, although I'm taking the year off because of illness. I've never taken a formal computer course but I may well do that at some point in the future. I've got all my info about Ubuntu and Linux in general either from this forum or through other websites.
One of my biggest regrets in life is not taking high school more seriously and then going on to study astrophysics or cosmology.

andy:)

koenn
December 22nd, 2010, 10:43 PM
Computer Science is not a real science, and has very little to do with computers (who said that ?)

also, if by veteran ubunbtu contributers you mean Ubuntu developers, this forum is probably not the right place to ask.

lastly, there's 2 approaches to choosing a field of study

1- pick a job, or a type of job, that you'd like to do. Then choose the study that provides you with the skills and knowledge for such a job.

2- study something you're really interested in. Since you're interested, you're highly motivated, which makes the study slightly less demanding. Also, your heart is in it so you'll put in more effort more easily. You probably get good at this. Which makes you the kind of person employers want to hire. After you finished studying, find a job you like.


downside of approach #1 is : by the time you finish your studies, the world has changed and that kind of job you had in mind doesn't exist anymore. Or you have changed, and that type of job doesn't look so appealing anymore. Probably both.

approach #2 is usually the wiser choice.

Little Bones
December 23rd, 2010, 01:42 AM
Computer Science is not a real science, and has very little to do with computers (who said that ?)

also, if by veteran ubunbtu contributers you mean Ubuntu developers, this forum is probably not the right place to ask.

lastly, there's 2 approaches to choosing a field of study

1- pick a job, or a type of job, that you'd like to do. Then choose the study that provides you with the skills and knowledge for such a job. [

2- study something you're really interested in. Since you're interested, you're highly motivated, which makes the study slightly less demanding. Also, your heart is in it so you'll put in more effort more easily. You probably get good at this. Which makes you the kind of person employers want to hire. After you finished studying, find a job you like.


downside of approach #1 is : by the time you finish your studies, the world has changed and that kind of job you had in mind doesn't exist anymore. Or you have changed, and that type of job doesn't look so appealing anymore. Probably both.

approach #2 is usually the wiser choice.

Always great to study what you enjoy, it does in fact make studying easier (in the classes you enjoy of course, not unusual to end up with 1 or 2 a year that you don't like but in the grand scheme not so bad). Bonus if it gets you a good job.

You're in a damned if you do and damned if you don't situation occasionally when choosing a career, but with technology becoming more and more important to our lives computer science is probably still a useful degree. I'm in my second year of kinesiology, so if you have further questions don't hesitate to reply or get in contact with me.

Bölvağur
December 23rd, 2010, 01:45 AM
So I'm going to college soon and I have a few questiosn for veteran Ubuntu contributors:

1. Did you major in Computer Science to acquire the skills you have to alter Linux systems? If so, is CS heavy on mathematics?

2. What type of job do you have at the moment?

3. If you could have done something differently what would it be?

1. no I did not major in CS to acquire linux skills. I got it for other reasons. It's much less math than software engineering and such.

2. Web programmer

3. If I'd change my past my current relationship status would also be... so I wouldn't want to change anything.

Lightstar
December 23rd, 2010, 03:23 AM
1. Did you major in Computer Science to acquire the skills you have to alter Linux systems? If so, is CS heavy on mathematics?

Studied in web design, learned a bit of unix in that course since alot of servers are based on Unix. But I was into linux way before then. I got my linux skills from interest, not from school.

2. What type of job do you have at the moment?

Immigration / Enforcement Ops. We remove criminals who come from other countries.

3. If you could have done something differently what would it be?

I wouldn't have studied web design, I would have chosen a field much more fitting for me.

Zzl1xndd
December 23rd, 2010, 03:46 AM
1. Did you major in Computer Science to acquire the skills you have to alter Linux systems?

No, I studied network administration.


2. What type of job do you have at the moment?

I currently work as a Project Specialist for a Large E-Learning Company


3. If you could have done something differently what would it be?

I would have went back to school earlier in life.





Out side of your 3 main questions I would recommend checking with the College/University to see what kind of placement rate they have for the program you are interested in.

Kdar
December 23rd, 2010, 04:22 AM
Student in Electrical Engineering. But probably will do my master's in Computer Engineering. Want to learn more about computer architecture and embedded design.

Legeril
December 23rd, 2010, 04:54 AM
1. Did you major in Computer Science to acquire the skills you have to alter Linux systems?

- I started uni doing Computer Network Engineering, I hated and changed courses to Computer Games Technology. I had to do a bit of Unix work and programming in my first course after that I was a straight concept artist - so no formal Linux training.

2. What type of job do you have at the moment?

- I'm living in China and studying Kung Fu while teaching English. Protip: What you end up doping after university hardly ever coincides with what you studied in, there are many factors for this in the UK its purely lack of jobs.


3. If you could have done something differently what would it be?

- I would change nothing, you are a product of your experience - so that would mean changing who you are. Though it might have been nice to figure out that what you study at Uni is mostly useless a little earlier :P and so not felt so pressured to choose a high income profession so early on.

phrostbyte
December 23rd, 2010, 05:00 AM
1. BS in Computer Science with a MS in Computer Science in progress. CS is indeed a lot of math. I wouldn't say I went into CS to learn about Linux, but Linux did inspire me to go into CS.

2. Software Engineer

3. I would have gotten in CS a lot earlier. I am literally in love with the field of Computer Science.

Khakilang
December 23rd, 2010, 05:06 AM
My knowledge of computer especially hardware are mostly self taught. I wish I could go back in time to study computer science. But it was my passion that wanting me to learn more about computer. I believe if you enjoy and passionate enough about the subject than it shouldn't be difficult for you. Anyway, good luck to you and hope it turns out well.

Megaptera
December 23rd, 2010, 08:27 AM
1. Did you major in Computer Science to acquire the skills you have to alter Linux systems? If so, is CS heavy on mathematics?

--No I didn't go to Uni. The course I wanted to do was undersubscribed. Picked up linux user knowledge from the internet.

2. What type of job do you have at the moment?

-- Customs: finding illegal goods at import/export, getting suspects to Court.

3. If you could have done something differently what would it be?

-- Would have taken the IT route with my current job when I started and gravitated to computer forensics and then maybe have taken those skills to the private sector.

handy
December 23rd, 2010, 09:38 AM
Me, I'm just a lawn mower - you can tell me by the way I walk.

drawkcab
December 24th, 2010, 01:48 AM
Philosopher.

VorpalBunny
December 24th, 2010, 08:48 AM
Me, I'm just a lawn mower - you can tell me by the way I walk.

Yay Genesis! :popcorn:

On topic, I'm currently studying for a BS in Computer Science. All my Linux experience has been self-taught though. Probably lots of CS programs are perhaps justifiably focused on landing a job or internship, thus focusing more on Software Engineering in a corporate environment, but I like understanding the little details of how the system works so I do a lot of extracurricular stuff with Linux and identify more with the stereotypical hacker/nerd type. :)

The math involved would vary depending on how theoretical you get. If you're doing research on algorithms and stuff I would imagine the math gets pretty intense, but if you're working on an end-user program like a game or office suite or something it isn't too bad (unless you're doing physics simulation or something). However, the jobs where you're just coding an application (say my professors) are precisely the ones that anyone could do and get outsourced all the time.

If I had to do everything over I would have started earlier, like someone above me said. I didn't do anything with computers except play games and use Word until I entered college, so I basically started at square one and had a lot of catching up to do.

handy
December 24th, 2010, 10:52 AM
Well done, off their first LP too. :)

Redache
December 24th, 2010, 10:57 AM
I'm currently studying Computer Science with a strong leaning towards Artificial Intelligence. My University do emphasise Unix ability and in the first year have a course that focuses on being able to use the terminal effectively and so on. Sometimes things feel a little diluted due to a lowering of the entry barrier but overall I like Computer Science and the theoretical side of things as opposed to the learning to write business apps side of things. I hope to do a PhD that involves Artificial Intelligence when I graduate. Most of my personal Linux skills are self taught and are continuously improving.

wiggy25
December 24th, 2010, 11:26 AM
I'm a service engineer driving round the UK installing/repairing thermoforming machines.

Most of the stuff I've learned on PC's is self taught, there was no PC studies at any of the schools I went to.
Tell a lie, we had one hour on some BBC model B's... how old am I!!

One thing I have realised, if you really enjoy doing something as a hobby, you most likely won't want to do it as a job!!
This is from friends who have swapped jobs and wished they hadn't.

Lucky for me there were still apprenticeships, so leaving school went straight to work, with one day a week at college.
Funny, really happy leaving school then spent the next 7years going to college one day a week, while working the rest of the week.

Would I change anything.....I don't think so, otherwise I wouldn't be where I am now.

Cheers

Ian

amsterdamharu
December 24th, 2010, 12:08 PM
1. Did you major in Computer Science to acquire the skills you have to alter Linux systems?
I self studies programming out of interest, had a pc and tried to play with it a bit (no games) and got into programming VB in office. Found a job as a beginner programmer with VB com+ and asp then moved to VB.net.

2. What type of job do you have at the moment?
The last 4 years I am teaching English in a kindergarten. Funny as you get better at things you start loosing interest because it's just getting boring. Still am a bit of a computer nerd so try to find out more and more about Linux thing (just out of interest as well)

3. If you could have done something differently what would it be?
Nothing really, maybe would have gone to University or finished high school. I ended up working together with BA degree people but their salary was higher because they've studied. The longer I worked the more I got to do and the higher the salary got but would have started out much better if I only had a BA or at least some degree. Now have MCSD certification but didn't bother to do the new MCSD for .net.

My interest in computers leaned toward programming rather than maintaining them. If you want to learn programming I suggest following the Java tutorial from beginning to end. They have great forums.

koenn
December 24th, 2010, 02:21 PM
One thing I have realised, if you really enjoy doing something as a hobby, you most likely won't want to do it as a job!!
This is from friends who have swapped jobs and wished they hadn't.


Well, that depends ...

At some point in my life, I discovered that I took to (effectively) using software a lot faster than my colleagues. I also developed an interest in how it all worked, that software, the computers, networks, ... It became a hobby.

Most of what I learned came from just tinkering, reading stuff on the internet, quite a few books (hurray for public libraries!). Then, when I began to feel that randomly picking up stuff left and right left me with gaps, I started taking courses and evening classes to get a more in depth, formal education on systems and network administration (and some programming). I still considered this a hobby.
But at the same time, because I was getting bored with the (not IT) job I had at the time, I started looking for other opportunities, and ended up in the sysadmin / chief of IT position I currently hold.

It feels a lot like getting paid for doing a hobby.

Work is different from a hobby. There's a certain level of responsibility. And requirements to meet and expectations to live up to. And you don't always get to do whatever you feel like the moment you feel like it.

But still, given that you'll spend roughly 1/3 of your time doing that job, it better be something you are interested in and can enjoy, 'cause if it isn't, you might find that your "hobbies" are actually therapy to help you deal with your job.
(Yeah, I exaggerate. Maybe. A bit.)

nothingspecial
December 24th, 2010, 08:19 PM
Well done, off their first LP too. :)

Sorry to contradict you again mate.

It`s off their 5th lp "Selling England By The Pound"

anyway

1. No, I did Performing Arts

2. I`m a fishmonger

3. Listened at school.........

...... no, seriously, in my teens and early 20`s I was in (and, sort of made a living from) bands and theatre companies. I had the best time ever.

I wouldn`t change that for the world. However, for every multi-millionaire star there are hundreds of failures. I`m one of them.

But I have a beautiful wife, wonderful kids, a nice home and I make a good living.

Still wished I`d listened at school though.

TNT1
December 24th, 2010, 08:28 PM
1. Did you major in Computer Science to acquire the skills you have to alter Linux systems? If so, is CS heavy on mathematics?

2. What type of job do you have at the moment?

3. If you could have done something differently what would it be?

1. I have a BA Communications...

2. Haha... I just told the CEO (I report(ed) direct to him) to take his job and shovel it...)

2.5 I did sell assorted 'IT' cr@p...

3. Start my own business ten years ago. But now works too.

FatherChristmas
December 24th, 2010, 09:48 PM
I came from the North Pole. I make wooden toys and once a year I bring happiness to all who've been good.

fugazi32
December 24th, 2010, 10:41 PM
Warehouse Operative/Office Admin Work

Though I do come from a Webdesign background, I have taken all sorts of jobs before.

:p

handy
December 25th, 2010, 05:52 AM
Sorry to contradict you again mate.

It`s off their 5th lp "Selling England By The Pound"

Was that their 5th!? When I started reading your post I saw another Genesis album cover, though Genesis was all I could see on it in my minds eye.

Anyway thanks for putting my old memory straight. It is a looong time since I have seen or heard that album; back in the early 1970's.



anyway

1. No, I did Performing Arts

2. I`m a fishmonger

3. Listened at school.........

...... no, seriously, in my teens and early 20`s I was in (and, sort of made a living from) bands and theatre companies. I had the best time ever.

I wouldn`t change that for the world. However, for every multi-millionaire star there are hundreds of failures. I`m one of them.

But I have a beautiful wife, wonderful kids, a nice home and I make a good living.

Still wished I`d listened at school though.

I can relate to all of that...

I was not long out of school when Selling England by the Pound was released in Oz. :)

& yeh, I really should have gone to Uni' for the education & then got into my own life.

Next time maybe... ;)

inobe
December 25th, 2010, 06:04 AM
tradesman

construction, electrician, plumber, mechanic, electronics repair, management, heavy equipment operator and then some.

computers are more of a hobby but on occasion i fix them too.

yep when you guys are in the office for eight plus hours, i'm outside smiling at you guys trapped inside :P

handy
December 25th, 2010, 06:19 AM
tradesman

construction, electrician, plumber, mechanic, electronics repair, management, heavy equipment operator and then some.

computers are more of a hobby but on occasion i fix them too.

yep when you guys are in the office for eight plus hours, i'm outside smiling at you guys trapped inside :P

I did lots of things too. My favourite was being a turf (sod) farmer. So I know what you mean inobe re your last statement. :)

I adored being a farmer on the river, driving my tractor, taking in the natural beauty of the environment, thinking about whatever, often deep & meaningful thoughts to the omm of the tractor coming through my earmuffs. :)

Legendary_Bibo
December 25th, 2010, 07:10 AM
So I'm going to college soon and I have a few questiosn for veteran Ubuntu contributors:

1. Did you major in Computer Science to acquire the skills you have to alter Linux systems? If so, is CS heavy on mathematics?

2. What type of job do you have at the moment?

3. If you could have done something differently what would it be?

1. I was a Bioengineering major, but I decided to change it to education of mathematics (I want to be a Math professor, but I'll have to be a high school teacher at first). I'm guessing that if you went into developing hardware, or algorithm infested software then yeah you would need to know a lot of mathematics. I learned Linux out of my own satisfaction, but I didn't want to have to take classes to learn more.

2. Right now I work as a math tutor, and I've done a bit of linux tutoring as well. I'm taking a Linux class as an elective, but I can't take the second level class even though I've self taught myself everything I've learned about Linux, and it's more than what's covered in the first level Linux course. Easy A I suppose.

3. I wish I knew that my heart felt more at home with pure mathematics before I went knee deep into engineering, but such is life.

owise1
December 25th, 2010, 07:27 AM
1. Did you major in Computer Science to acquire the skills you have to alter Linux systems? If so, is CS heavy on mathematics?

No I am and electrical engineer - graduated in 1980 in Power- mucked with electronics - built a sinclair 2650 microcomputer in early '80s - found assemble language too bloody hard - discovered PCs in the 90's and linux in 2004.

2. What type of job do you have at the moment?

Still electrical engineer but more in management

3. If you could have done something differently what would it be?

Teacher in some technology subject

wgarider
December 25th, 2010, 07:19 PM
So I'm going to college soon and I have a few questiosn for veteran Ubuntu contributors:

1. Did you major in Computer Science to acquire the skills you have to alter Linux systems? If so, is CS heavy on mathematics?

2. What type of job do you have at the moment?

3. If you could have done something differently what would it be?

1-No-learned on the job. My college degree had virtually no studies in CS.
2-IT architecture and engineering for a media company
3-Nothing........

nerdybrunette
November 3rd, 2011, 05:05 PM
lastly, there's 2 approaches to choosing a field of study

1- pick a job, or a type of job, that you'd like to do. Then choose the study that provides you with the skills and knowledge for such a job.

2- study something you're really interested in. Since you're interested, you're highly motivated, which makes the study slightly less demanding. Also, your heart is in it so you'll put in more effort more easily. You probably get good at this. Which makes you the kind of person employers want to hire. After you finished studying, find a job you like.


downside of approach #1 is : by the time you finish your studies, the world has changed and that kind of job you had in mind doesn't exist anymore. Or you have changed, and that type of job doesn't look so appealing anymore. Probably both.

approach #2 is usually the wiser choice.

Not sure if anybody is still following this, but approach #2 is DEFINITELY the choice to go with. I personally chose approach #1 and I did change as an individual. I no longer was interested in what I was studying by senior year. Unfortunately, now I'm stuck doing a job that I don't really like.

So yes, study something you really love. In my opinion, that's the only way to go. If you love what you do, the career will come, and so will the money.