PDA

View Full Version : What is the difference between College Math and College Logic?



waloshin
December 20th, 2010, 07:36 AM
What is the difference between College Math and College Logic?

Courses.

3Miro
December 20th, 2010, 11:43 AM
I think one is in the Math department and one is in the Philosophy department. I would also guess that Math is more theoretical, while logic is more applied. Either way, when thought properly, both have the goal to make you think.

mips
December 20th, 2010, 04:58 PM
Let me guess, you are trying to get out of math as I have read you can do logic instead of math?

http://www.wordiq.com/definition/College_logic

College logic - Definition
Logic is the study of argument not angry disagreements or fisticuffs, but instead the giving of reasons to believe things. College logic is a contemporary name for logic presented as a pedagogic subject, in a tradition that goes back two millennia.

As it is studied in a traditional first logic course in college (based on traditional logic), logic is the study of (1) argument form, (2) the qualities (of arguments) of validity, cogency, and soundness, and (3) how to construct, identify, interpret, and evaluate various kinds of arguments. Traditional treatments of logic have included discussion of not just arguments, but the varieties and standards of definitions, as well.

Logic, like mathematics and physics, has a theoretical part and an applied part. Parts (1) and (2) of the above-described definition together describe the theoretical part of logic, and (3) describes the applied part. Just as a nonmathematician learning physics should study mathematics in order to use or apply mathematics well, a nonlogician in any task that requires reasoning, such as confirming rational beliefs, should study logic to learn how to use or apply logic well. Moreover, like mathematics and physics (and many other subjects), one has to practice quite a bit if one wants to gain any facility in using logic. Therefore, logic teachers will frequently assign students to analyze real-life arguments, in roughly the fashion as can be found in the Sherlock Holmes article under the "Holmesian deduction" heading.

See also traditional logic and Aristotelian logic. For comparison, see multi-valued logic.

http://www.wwnorton.com/college/phil/logic3/

drawkcab
December 20th, 2010, 10:37 PM
I've taught logic at the university level for several years now. In intro to formal logic, we teach you how to symbolically analyze the syntactic structure of arguments. In other words, just like mathematics provides you conceptual shortcuts for analyzing quantities so logic provides you conceptual shortcuts for analyzing the inferences drawn from the premises (sentences accepted as being true) of an argument to its conclusion.

Is it more difficult than college algebra? Yes and No. Logic is not as difficult in the sense that a background in high school math is not required. So if you stink at math you get to start from scratch in logic. On the other hand, some people find learning an entirely new formal system in one semester overwhelming and in that sense logic may prove to be more difficult.

From a practical angle, if you are thinking about law school at all it is probably a good idea to take logic.

3Miro
December 20th, 2010, 11:14 PM
I've taught logic at the university level for several years now. In intro to formal logic, we teach you how to symbolically analyze the syntactic structure of arguments. In other words, just like mathematics provides you conceptual shortcuts for analyzing quantities so logic provides you conceptual shortcuts for analyzing the inferences drawn from the premises (sentences accepted as being true) of an argument to its conclusion.


If this is what they teach, then it is more useful then College Algebra. This is very useful and you will not see much of it even in Calculus. The earliest that Math goes that deep is Discrete Math or Abstract Algebra (maybe Advanced Calculus or a good Geometry Class).

oarion7
December 21st, 2010, 12:10 AM
What is the difference between College Math and College Logic?

Courses.

The exact meaning of "College Math" depends on your school. That could go in a few different directions, but if it's an introductory course it's probably very similar to a High School pre-calculus course, but maybe a little more challenging (or not), depending on the approach of your professor and your college's policies.

They are certainly not the same, and assuming Logic means Logic and that it's offered by the Philosophy department, it could be a very worthwhile endeavor to take it. It would beyond any doubt be more challenging than an introductory mathematics course, but as the professor said, it may be worthwhile to take it.

It should be a requirement (and probably is) for anyone going into law school, but also for anyone studying the art of rhetoric or even writing of any kind, and certainly philosophy. At my undergraduate college, it was required for everyone no matter what field of study.

It's not for everyone, but I had a life changing experience in mine.

Hard to say what a course called "College Math" really is without knowing more.

Good luck.

chris200x9
December 21st, 2010, 12:16 AM
What is the difference between College Math and College Logic?

Courses.


first of all it's pronounced logics, and second truth tables.

That is all.