PDA

View Full Version : Being old doesn't make something a classic



asifnaz
December 18th, 2010, 07:02 AM
I have a 1987 Mac Plus (build date April, 1987), that has 4 MB of ram, two 800 KB floppy drives (one internal, and one external). All work just fine.I thought I could sell this "antique" for a grand total for something like "one million "

But so far " all original system that has not been upgraded or mucked with, and at the moment it has 1 bid for $19.95



I wonder if I could find some sucker willing to pay something for it. Now I understand being out doesn't make something a classic.:cry:

Chronon
December 18th, 2010, 07:59 AM
You're joking, right?

wojox
December 18th, 2010, 08:03 AM
Today, working Mac Plus models sell on eBay for about $25.

Rasa1111
December 18th, 2010, 08:15 AM
One mill?
that's it?

Ill take 2 if you got'em. O_o

wilee-nilee
December 18th, 2010, 08:24 AM
Has to be 30 years for a car.;)

Sam Fallow
December 18th, 2010, 08:53 AM
... no it just means it's old.

Think of it this way

Every cognac is a brandy
Not every brandy is a cognac.

asifnaz
December 18th, 2010, 10:30 AM
You're joking, right?


I am quite serious .

theasprint
December 18th, 2010, 10:36 AM
http://www.instructables.com/id/PC-in-a-Macintosh-Classic-Case/

It may get some more value :D

Chronon
December 18th, 2010, 09:58 PM
I am quite serious .

Then I have a cereal box from the early 1980s that I would like to sell you. It is in quite good condition and there's even some cereal -- Corn Flakes! -- left inside of it. Considering its age I think that $50 000 would be an extremely reasonable price.

forrestcupp
December 18th, 2010, 11:36 PM
I didn't think any personal computers built in 1987 were capable of having 4MB of RAM. I remember in the very early 90s that 640K seemed like a lot.

Majorix
December 18th, 2010, 11:41 PM
I didn't think any personal computers built in 1987 were capable of having 4MB of RAM. I remember in the very early 90s that 640K seemed like a lot.

According to this page (http://www.everymac.com/systems/apple/mac_classic/stats/mac_plus.html) it seems likely. But yes, it IS monstrous for its time :)

qamelian
December 18th, 2010, 11:49 PM
I didn't think any personal computers built in 1987 were capable of having 4MB of RAM. I remember in the very early 90s that 640K seemed like a lot.

Actually, the Atari ST of that vintage maxed out at 4 MB. Mine is still in full working order with all the original parts including colour monitor and 30 MB hard drive. :)

MisterGaribaldi
December 19th, 2010, 12:06 AM
Back in the day, Macs were quite a bit ahead of "IBM PC Compatibles". The Mac Plus and SE could go up to 4MB of RAM, and the Mac II could go up to 8MB.

Npl
December 19th, 2010, 12:45 AM
Child toys, the Amiga500 could be brought to 128.5 MB Ram. Granted, those extension cards didnt come till the mid 90`s, but its still a computer from 1987.

handy
December 19th, 2010, 12:54 AM
Being old makes something Vintage, Veteran, & Antique.

To get those labels all you need to do is reach a certain age.

So I disagree with the thread's title. As I think that reaching a certain age or being of a certain type of computer architecture does make it classic.

e.g. A 16 bit ISA slot Awe 32 sound card is a classic sound card.

3Miro
December 19th, 2010, 01:08 AM
Old things have a value for either sentimental reasons or for showoff reasons. Someone may be attached to an old computer, if they used one like that in the past, but this computer is hardly a showoff. If I were to drive around in a 1967 Mustang, I will attract attention, with this laptop, nobody can do anything useful today.

I guess nobody has sentimental reasons worth more than 20 dollars either, although you may be able to find someone.

I recently made a Micro-ATX build in a nice micro tower with a handle on top. I then took it to work to use there and my boss started laughing remembering how he got one of the first "relocatable" Mac machines. He said it looked the same, except it was heavier.

handy
December 19th, 2010, 01:26 AM
Further on my previous statement:

Because something has made it to the age to be classified as Vintage, Veteran, Antique or Classic, it doesn't mean that they necessarily have any increased value due to this.

Some items, or just about all the items in some instances, of that category can be completely worthless junk to all but the tiniest minority of people on the planet.

So the nomenclature does not necessarily equate to an increasing value.

Though there are some things from the computer world that I have got rid of in the past that I wish I still had, like the portable laptop computers (similar to the original Osborne but different, made for the military I think) with an inbuilt 6" Sony CRT screen. I had 2 or three of those at one time, which I probably got for nothing.

I put Pentium class motherboards in them for the fun of it & managed to sell them. Which was lucky because they were basically pretty useless for most people.

Dr. C
December 19th, 2010, 01:37 AM
I didn't think any personal computers built in 1987 were capable of having 4MB of RAM. I remember in the very early 90s that 640K seemed like a lot.

640K was nothing in the early 1990's. 16 MB was the maximum memory for the 286 and the 286 came out in 1982. The typical memory for a 286 in the 1980's was 1MB. Windows 3.1 Enhanced mode (1992) has minimum memory requirements of 2MB, Windows NT 3.5 (1994) had minimum memory requirements of 12 MB.

The Real Dave
December 19th, 2010, 02:26 AM
Hold on, an internal floppy drive?

Dr. C
December 19th, 2010, 02:45 AM
Hold on, an internal floppy drive?

In a Mac?

qamelian
December 19th, 2010, 02:00 PM
In a Mac?

Sure. We didn't always have CD/DVD-ROM drives, y'know! :)

HermanAB
December 19th, 2010, 05:14 PM
...maybe a couple million Lira or Drachma, or a few trillion Zimbabwe Dollars, but otherwise you are SOL...

forrestcupp
December 20th, 2010, 04:30 PM
640K was nothing in the early 1990's. 16 MB was the maximum memory for the 286 and the 286 came out in 1982. The typical memory for a 286 in the 1980's was 1MB. Windows 3.1 Enhanced mode (1992) has minimum memory requirements of 2MB, Windows NT 3.5 (1994) had minimum memory requirements of 12 MB.

By "very early 90's" I basically meant 1990. Things progressed very quickly between 1989 and 1994. In 1990 there were still quite a few people using Commodore 64s with 64K of RAM. I bought my first decent post-C64 computer in early '95, and it only came with 16MB. I know it was possible to get more, but it definitely wasn't commonplace. (It didn't take long for it to become commonplace, though.)

Nevertheless, 640K was something in the late 80's, which was later than the computer in the original post. 4MB in 1987 was unheard of, and it had to have cost a pretty penny.

mips
December 20th, 2010, 04:51 PM
I didn't think any personal computers built in 1987 were capable of having 4MB of RAM. I remember in the very early 90s that 640K seemed like a lot.

Many were. The Amiga from '86 could do 9MB & Atari from '85 could do 4MB. The Mac Plus could do 4MB. The Apple IIGS from '86 could do 8MB. But keep in mind that ram was very expensive in those days so not many people would have upgraded to the max. 1-2MB was probably the general ceiling of most people.

There were also other systems like NeXT etc but you cannot really consider them home computers dues to their astronomical prices.

forrestcupp
December 20th, 2010, 05:04 PM
Many were. The Amiga from '86 could do 9MB & Atari from '85 could do 4MB. The Mac Plus could do 4MB. The Apple IIGS from '86 could do 8MB. But keep in mind that ram was very expensive in those days so not many people would have upgraded to the max. 1-2MB was probably the general ceiling of most people.


That was kind of my point. Even if it was possible, RAM was so expensive that there's no way it would have been commonplace to have that much.

MisterGaribaldi
December 20th, 2010, 07:57 PM
You know, sometimes I think people forget about the the factor of "legacy effects".

When it came to things such as the "typical" amount of RAM actually found in computers, Macs were *far* ahead of PCs. This is the case for a couple of reasons, but primarily because the average PC was still using DOS and supporting legacy DOS applications well into the late 1990s.

In my experience, we didn't see people adopting a GUI environment on the PC side in any real quantity until Windows 95 came out, and even then there were still a LOT of people using at least *some* DOS-based apps in with Win95.

Bottom line: Macs averaged anything from about a 2 - 3 times lead in the amount of RAM actually installed (stock configuration, subsequent upgrade) over PCs. This doesn't even *begin* to address such issues as user expectations of systems and hardware, which is another area -- particularly with usability -- that Macs shined. PCs, for instance, were a haven for IRQ conflicts, and if I had a nickle for everyone I knew who (back then) had IRQ conflicts, I wouldn't need to work today.

Anyhow...

drawkcab
December 20th, 2010, 10:21 PM
My god I hope you're charging enough for shipping.

Old_Grey_Wolf
December 21st, 2010, 12:08 AM
I'm in my 60's; therefore, I am old. Grandma still thinks I am a classic. We have been married for over 40 years.
:lolflag:

handy
December 21st, 2010, 01:14 AM
Many were. The Amiga from '86 could do 9MB & Atari from '85 could do 4MB. The Mac Plus could do 4MB. The Apple IIGS from '86 could do 8MB. But keep in mind that ram was very expensive in those days so not many people would have upgraded to the max. 1-2MB was probably the general ceiling of most people.
...

I remember buying an A2000 once in the 1980s, when they had a deal going where you got a fast memory card thrown in with an extra 2MB of RAM, that card could be populated with 8MB. The card with 2MB on it was worth $1300- at the time!!!

It certainly was a good deal in its day.

mips
December 26th, 2010, 11:53 AM
I remember buying an A2000 once in the 1980s, when they had a deal going where you got a fast memory card thrown in with an extra 2MB of RAM, that card could be populated with 8MB. The card with 2MB on it was worth $1300- at the time!!!

It certainly was a good deal in its day.

I had the Amiga 500 with 512kB stock. Still remember ordering 512kB expansion cards for a friend and myself from Datel in the UK at some astronomical price, well for a kid anyway :D

At one stage I though about building my own card as my uncle could do the PCB for me but I needed to buy the ram chips. When I enquired as to the price of the chips from a electronics shop the old gent behind the counter called me sir saying anybody that purchased those deserved to be called sir, had a good chuckle but my hopes were dashed.

You got a sweet deal there!

handy
December 26th, 2010, 12:12 PM
@mips: I can't remember what the price of the chips needed to populate those A2000 memory cards.

I do know that I never bought any of them.

I have a vague recollection that you had to populate in 2MB increments, & the chips were 1MB each. I'm not sure about that though.

JRV
December 26th, 2010, 02:41 PM
Has to be 30 years for a car.;)

No, a car must be manufactured before 1949, and be recognized as a classic by the Classic Car Club of America. My 1946 Lincoln is not a classic.

For a picture google "1946 Lincoln sedan" it's the first entry.

mips
December 27th, 2010, 09:12 AM
@mips: I can't remember what the price of the chips needed to populate those A2000 memory cards.

I do know that I never bought any of them.

I have a vague recollection that you had to populate in 2MB increments, & the chips were 1MB each. I'm not sure about that though.

If bundled with the A2000 then the card would have been a genuine Commodore product and the only 8MB card they made was the A2058 that had 2MB pre-installed.

The chips were indeed 1M1 DIPs and the card could be configured by jumpers for 2MB, 4MB & 8MB. 6MB was not a valid or accepted config. Your recollection is spot on except the chips were 1Mbit seeing you needed 16 to make up 2MB ;)

http://amiga.resource.cx/photos/photos/a2058.jpg
http://amiga.resource.cx/exp/search.pl?amiga=2000

handy
December 27th, 2010, 09:22 AM
If bundled with the A2000 then the card would have been a genuine Commodore product and the only 8MB card they made was the A2058 that had 2MB pre-installed.

The chips were indeed 1M1 DIPs and the card could be configured by jumpers for 2MB, 4MB & 8MB. 6MB was not a valid or accepted config. Your recollection is spot on except the chips were 1Mbit seeing you needed 16 to make up 2MB ;)

http://amiga.resource.cx/photos/photos/a2058.jpg
http://amiga.resource.cx/exp/search.pl?amiga=2000

I knew you'd do the research & post it back. :)

That card does bring back memories, even for me! lol

Thanks mips, you do cool things. :)

asifnaz
December 27th, 2010, 01:24 PM
I am really happy to tell you that my "antique" mac sold for 499 $ .

I have promised so many treats seems like I have to spend all money
:p

nikhilbhardwaj
December 27th, 2010, 01:45 PM
Then I have a cereal box from the early 1980s that I would like to sell you. It is in quite good condition and there's even some cereal -- Corn Flakes! -- left inside of it. Considering its age I think that $50 000 would be an extremely reasonable price.
+1
you're very funny

handy
December 27th, 2010, 01:48 PM
I am really happy to tell you that my "antique" mac sold for 499 $ .

I have promised so many treats seems like I have to spend all money
:p

The only Mac that is capable of becoming an antique at this point in time is the Mac 128K. The 512K & the revised 128K that followed are not old enough yet.

If it was a Lisa or a Lisa 2, then you would have a chance of getting away with your antique statement.

If you own a Lisa you could make some money on it too. So PM me? :)

Doh! The hardware I have let slip through my fingers...

asifnaz
December 27th, 2010, 01:56 PM
The only Mac that is capable of becoming an antique at this point in time is the Mac 128K. The 512K & the revised 128K that followed are not old enough yet.

If it was a Lisa or a Lisa 2, then you would have a chance of getting away with your antique statement.

If you own a Lisa you could make some money on it too. So PM me? :)

Doh! The hardware I have let slip through my fingers...

I had a 1987 Mac Plus , had 4 MB of ram, two 800 KB floppy drive .
That has become a history now .
I have a G3 Mac from year 2000 . I could send it free of cost if you pay shipping :popcorn:

handy
December 27th, 2010, 02:03 PM
I had a 1987 Mac Plus , had 4 MB of ram, two 800 KB floppy drive .
That has become a history now .
I have a G3 Mac from year 2000 . I could send it free of cost if you pay shipping :popcorn:

We have a G4 Powerbook 15" from early 2000, too. ;)

Where are you posting from, & what model is it, I may be interested?

asifnaz
December 27th, 2010, 02:42 PM
We have a G4 Powerbook 15" from early 2000, too. ;)

Where are you posting from, & what model is it, I may be interested?

I am just kidding . I have one but you have to pay a lot as shipping . you can get such mac from a freecycle ...

handy
December 28th, 2010, 12:35 AM
I am just kidding . I have one but you have to pay a lot as shipping . you can get such mac from a freecycle ...

No Freecycle in Oz. :)

I was offered a couple of eMacs for free the other day, but I don't have a use for them. If they had of been a notebook though I would certainly have been happy to take up the offer & stick Arch on them. :)