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Naiki Muliaina
December 14th, 2010, 05:03 PM
Right, have not been following Android as much as I would have liked but it appears to be a steadfast on cheap tablets now, is popular on mobile phones, and I am sure I saw a netbook with it on. Couple of Q's. :)

Is Android the 'next OS' on the market?

Is it installable / viable to use on PC's at all? - If yes, has anyone ever made an ISO of it installable onto PC's?

How far is the code from Linux? - Expanding that one : Is it close enough to have easily ported apps or is it far detached like OSX and Linux?

tweakedenigma
December 14th, 2010, 05:22 PM
Android seems to be doing really well and I would say it is the 'Next OS'.

I have seen it on a few netbooks, however I am not sure if there is an ISO out there for it to download and I am not sure it would make a good Desktop OS. Great on Phones though Love my Liquid E.

Android uses the Dalvik Virtual machine for all its applications (as I understand it). So I don't think the android stuff would work out of the box in Linux.

weasel fierce
December 14th, 2010, 05:27 PM
My understanding is that its the linux kernel but it doesn't have the same sort of tools that linux desktop systems uses, so porting is not easy.

idi0tf0wl
December 14th, 2010, 05:38 PM
My understanding is that its the linux kernel but it doesn't have the same sort of tools that linux desktop systems uses, so porting is not easy.

This is correct. Everything runs in a custom virtual machine. There are emulators, though, so it's possible to port android apps to Linux (or OSX or Windows, for that matter, because here we're talking about Linux as an OS atop the Linux kernel), but it's not necessarily a worthwhile translation. Porting a Linux program to Android, on the other hand, would be a tall order!

Anzan
December 14th, 2010, 05:40 PM
It doesn't use X, it has most GNU tools but it has to be hacked in order for you to have root. There are however many Open Source and GPLed apps and thousands that are free as in beer and ad supported.

Its market share on mobiles has quadrapolled and has much more than RIM or Apple's iOS,it's being put on tablets but only Android 3 will be made to also run on them sometime next year.

It's going to be ubiquitous.

Ubuntu will be destroyed by aiming for tablets/netbooks and the Unity nonsense and thus basically crippling its use on desktops.

weasel fierce
December 14th, 2010, 05:43 PM
It doesn't use X, it has most GNU tools but it has to be hacked in order for you to have root. There are however many Open Source and GPLed apps and thousands that are free as in beer and ad supported.

Its market share on mobiles has quadrapolled and has much more than RIM or Apple's iOS,it's being put on tablets but only Android 3 will be made to also run on them sometime next year.

It's going to be ubiquitous.

Ubuntu will be destroyed by aiming for tablets/netbooks and the Unity nonsense and thus basically crippling its use on desktops.

I have a great idea! Can we have one more thread about unity?
Nobody has ever brought that up before!
:evil:

Naiki Muliaina
December 14th, 2010, 08:46 PM
Interesting, I have been wondering what the next OS would be. I was thinking it might have been chromium (/chrome / google OS / whatever, I dont know its name but you know what I am talking about). Would be nice to see a less pure cloud OS be popular for a bit longer. Thank you all.

I see it was released under a free software license back in 2008. I wonder if it could end up like the Linux we know with 800 different spins of it. Going to deffo have to pay more attention to Android.

sanderd17
December 14th, 2010, 08:57 PM
Interesting, I have been wondering what the next OS would be. I was thinking it might have been chromium (/chrome / google OS / whatever, I dont know its name but you know what I am talking about). Would be nice to see a less pure cloud OS be popular for a bit longer. Thank you all.

I see it was released under a free software license back in 2008. I wonder if it could end up like the Linux we know with 800 different spins of it. Going to deffo have to pay more attention to Android.

Well, you could see the custom roms as distro's, there is not much difference between the delivered android and the roms (if you stay with the same version), it's just like going from Ubuntu to Mint: different interface and some bug fixes but still the same.

The major difference between PCs and phones is that phones are locked, people have to find a hack to put a custom rom on it. So the landscape is not that scattered. Each phone also has some particular bugs, like with the graphical cards in the Linux world. So using a ROM made for one phone on another might not work.

As an example: the roms for the HTC click: http://forum.xda-developers.com/forumdisplay.php?f=544

AllRadioisDead
December 14th, 2010, 10:40 PM
Well, you could see the custom roms as distro's, there is not much difference between the delivered android and the roms (if you stay with the same version), it's just like going from Ubuntu to Mint: different interface and some bug fixes but still the same.

The major difference between PCs and phones is that phones are locked, people have to find a hack to put a custom rom on it. So the landscape is not that scattered. Each phone also has some particular bugs, like with the graphical cards in the Linux world. So using a ROM made for one phone on another might not work.

As an example: the roms for the HTC click: http://forum.xda-developers.com/forumdisplay.php?f=544

ROM's are completely device specific.

ukripper
December 15th, 2010, 03:37 PM
I have a great idea! Can we have one more thread about unity?
Nobody has ever brought that up before!
:evil:

unity rocks!!:p <I hope i dont get infraction for using word unity>

Jay Car
December 15th, 2010, 03:57 PM
I have a great idea! Can we have one more thread about unity? Nobody has ever brought that up before!
:evil:

^ This made me chuckle. :)

Anzan
December 15th, 2010, 06:29 PM
Yes, of course Unity has had much discussion here. As it should. (Anyone really interested should subscribe to the ayatana mailing list.)

But back to Android. I wonder how Chrome OS for netbooks and Android for tablets will fare? Two distros both by Google.

Zlatan
December 15th, 2010, 09:41 PM
Yes, of course Unity has had much discussion here. As it should. (Anyone really interested should subscribe to the ayatana mailing list.)

But back to Android. I wonder how Chrome OS for netbooks and Android for tablets will fare? Two distros both by Google.

we all know that both of google os'es will include legal spyware within. and ubuntu will not

earthpigg
December 15th, 2010, 09:57 PM
Is it installable / viable to use on PC's at all? - If yes, has anyone ever made an ISO of it installable onto PC's?

even if installable, i'd say it isn't viable unless you are working with a touch-screen monitor that android can interact with.



How far is the code from Linux? - Expanding that one : Is it close enough to have easily ported apps or is it far detached like OSX and Linux?

someone already answered about the emulator.


what is possible, however, is to run pretty much any terminal app remotely using ssh. ultimately, this means that folks can fairly easily develop all sorts of fun ways to turn an android device into a computer remote control.

Anzan
December 16th, 2010, 12:07 AM
we all know that both of google os'es will include legal spyware within. and ubuntu will not

Oh, definitely. I don't mind too much on my smartphone though I try to seek out GPLed apps when I can.

But this is the kind of Linux we'll be seeing around us.

Naiki Muliaina
December 16th, 2010, 12:30 AM
even if installable, i'd say it isn't viable unless you are working with a touch-screen monitor that android can interact with.

There must be a simple mouse and keyboard program for it though because I have seen it on a netbook I am sure...

On another note, found out there is an ISO image of thing of Android 1.6 that can be booted on a PC off a flash drive. If anyones interested Ill dig the link back out and post it later.

wewantutopia
December 16th, 2010, 12:54 AM
LiveAndroid and Androidx86 both work pretty well with a mouse and keyboard in Virtualbox.

akand074
December 16th, 2010, 01:09 AM
There must be a simple mouse and keyboard program for it though because I have seen it on a netbook I am sure...

On another note, found out there is an ISO image of thing of Android 1.6 that can be booted on a PC off a flash drive. If anyones interested Ill dig the link back out and post it later.

Android is specifically designed for touch screens. It's based directly off the Linux Kernel. It's current release (gingerbread) is based on 2.6.35, and the previous release (Froyo) is based on 2.6.32. Anyways, you would have an terrible experience without a touch screen. Why would you even want it on a laptop? Android isn't even designed for Tablet's. It's tablet support is coming in it's next release (Honeycomb) early in 2011. Which will make it's tablet experience much better.

On the other hand, Chrome OS is designed specifically for non-touch screen computers. Basically just a web-based, social-networking/every day basic task use OS. Which is why it's specifically targets netbooks.

Naiki Muliaina
December 16th, 2010, 09:04 AM
Why would you even want it on a laptop?

Because it is an established platform it seems and different people have different needs.

Personally I need a mobile phone that acts like a PDA, I have a Samsung Corby Pro, which I use almost exclusively for media and internet. Other people have different needs of their mobiles. Some actually use them as a phone. ;) If from what I have been reading about Android, it fits the bill for me.

Lastly, although not heavily into the Linux world (except the ARCHO's tablets) touch screens are 'here' now, and probably to stay.

communityofexcellence
December 16th, 2010, 10:06 AM
If you've ever seen demos of chrome os it's severely limited relying almost entirely on cloud computing. I for one don't like having to rely solely on cloud based systems but if applied properly to the small cheap netbook market it could work.and android is exactly the same but its more simplified. I wouldn't ever use anything with android except for a tablet or cellphone.

Naiki Muliaina
December 16th, 2010, 10:39 AM
Aside from both being related to Google I am unsure how you can say they are the same... Android has hundred of apps installable & functional that can be run and used without net access. Chrome is more of a browser as an OS so may have plug ins, but is kinda useless without net access.

communityofexcellence
December 16th, 2010, 10:45 AM
Aside from both being related to Google I am unsure how you can say they are the same... Android has hundred of apps installable & functional that can be run and used without net access. Chrome is more of a browser as an OS so may have plug ins, but is kinda useless without net access.

Android is very much so useless without internet access, as are with its apps. Only a few good apps don't require net access. But android is more useful without internet than chrome os.

Naiki Muliaina
December 16th, 2010, 10:49 AM
I am unsure if your trolling, or if you have less of a clue than me...

http://www.android.com/market

Most of the top apps paid and free don't require net access past installing them. Correct me if I am missing something. ;)

Paqman
December 16th, 2010, 10:59 AM
Chrome is more of a browser as an OS so may have plug ins, but is kinda useless without net access.

When would you ever not have net access? As expected, 3G is built in on the CR-48 and it's likely to be the same with all ChromeOS netbooks.

Naiki Muliaina
December 16th, 2010, 11:05 AM
At the moment when I am in Scotland as it goes 3g is hit or miss in the Grampians, either way doesn't matter. I was more making the point that there is a blatant difference between Android and Chrome.

communityofexcellence
December 16th, 2010, 11:11 AM
I am unsure if your trolling, or if you have less of a clue than me...

http://www.android.com/market

Most of the top apps paid and free don't require net access past installing them. Correct me if I am missing something. ;)

You aren't missing a thing. You're very on top of it but my point was the experience is awful without active net connection, would you not agree? Ie... E mail, ad supported apps failing, tethering, online games, heavy computations done via external servers... Etc.

Oh, I see your recent post. No wonder. I don't have that problem so wouldn't really take in the importance of mostly locally stored apps. My apologies!

akand074
December 16th, 2010, 10:06 PM
You aren't missing a thing. You're very on top of it but my point was the experience is awful without active net connection, would you not agree? Ie... E mail, ad supported apps failing, tethering, online games, heavy computations done via external servers... Etc.

Oh, I see your recent post. No wonder. I don't have that problem so wouldn't really take in the importance of mostly locally stored apps. My apologies!

Well that's the case with every "Smart Phone". That's the whole point, brings the entire power of the Internet to your phone. Putting that aside, off the top of my head, I can't think of a single app personally as of right now that requires internet connection (other than the market and the internet browser obviously). My experience is fantastic. Though, putting that aside, not many people have a smart phone without a data plan, and those who don't.. well you still have wireless. The internet is the most important thing in computing right now really, it's not surprising that companies/applications are starting to assume you have an internet connection.

treesurf
December 17th, 2010, 03:22 AM
I do not have a data plan for my Android phone, and only connect to wifi maybe a few minutes each day. I have downloaded quite a few apps that do not require internet and which I find very useful, or entertaining for everyday usage.

AllRadioisDead
December 17th, 2010, 09:46 AM
Well that's the case with every "Smart Phone". That's the whole point, brings the entire power of the Internet to your phone. Putting that aside, off the top of my head, I can't think of a single app personally as of right now that requires internet connection (other than the market and the internet browser obviously). My experience is fantastic. Though, putting that aside, not many people have a smart phone without a data plan, and those who don't.. well you still have wireless. The internet is the most important thing in computing right now really, it's not surprising that companies/applications are starting to assume you have an internet connection.

I believe you can run all your applications on ChromeOS offline, however you data will simply sync when you're back online. The notebook does have an 8GB SSD on board.

Naiki Muliaina
December 17th, 2010, 11:24 AM
I believe you can run all your applications on ChromeOS offline, however you data will simply sync when you're back online. The notebook does have an 8GB SSD on board.

Ahhh now that is interesting! I was totally under the belief there was nothing you could do with Chrome OS offline. I wonder if that means well see plug ins usable offline in the future.

Paqman
December 17th, 2010, 11:34 PM
I was totally under the belief there was nothing you could do with Chrome OS offline.

HTML5 allows web apps to work offline.

Naiki Muliaina
December 18th, 2010, 01:30 AM
Can you save pages properly in Chrome OS?

Anzan
December 18th, 2010, 02:42 AM
Can you save pages properly in Chrome OS?

What do you mean? As HTML? As PDFs?

I should think so as one can do so with the browser.

Storage however would be quite limited (unless you pay for more) but things can always be dumped to USB or SD (there are ports for both on the cr-48.