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View Full Version : At long last, a working extent-friendly ext4 driver for Windows.



Starks
October 18th, 2010, 10:47 PM
Ext2fsd-0.48-bb8 (http://www.acc.umu.se/%7Ebosse/ext2fsd-0.48-bb8.zip) (Support for ext4 extents and fix for BSOD on Windows 7.)

My Windows 7 partition suddenly became more valuable.

Be sure to follow the readme.

Starks
October 19th, 2010, 05:54 PM
Really? Nobody cares?

blueturtl
October 19th, 2010, 06:26 PM
I actually consider it safer for Windows to remain oblivious to any other operating systems on the same hard-drive or machine. That way you can be sure nothing bad that happens in Windows can ever touch your Linux install.

miggols99
October 19th, 2010, 06:52 PM
I actually consider it safer for Windows to remain oblivious to any other operating systems on the same hard-drive or machine. That way you can be sure nothing bad that happens in Windows can ever touch your Linux install.
+1

I really hate it when Windows creates those thumb.db files everywhere! That's why I don't like Windows getting access to Linux...

MooseDog
October 19th, 2010, 11:16 PM
thx for sharing link, i'll look into it!

i have to agree, certainky makes windows more useful, a little bit at least.

agree also that giving windows knowledge about anything else but itself is a threat to others (lord knows win has a hard enough time dealing with its own problems), but i've solved that by always putting the two installs on two different drives, never! on one single one.

Lucradia
October 19th, 2010, 11:31 PM
+1

i really hate it when windows creates those thumb.db files everywhere! That's why i don't like windows getting access to linux...

qft

zekopeko
October 20th, 2010, 12:12 AM
+1

I really hate it when Windows creates those thumb.db files everywhere! That's why I don't like Windows getting access to Linux...

http://www.tweakxp.com/article36702.aspx

Easy fix.

CarpKing
October 20th, 2010, 01:08 AM
Interesting. I was wondering when something like this would come about. Last I heard, the ext3 driver worked by pretending the partition was ext2, which never seemed like the safest proposition.

On my desktop I have my shared partition as ext3 because when I set it up ntfs write support was shaky, but I was thinking about moving it to ntfs sometime just so I wasn't depending on ext2fs. That's how I have my laptop set up.

Is there a btrfs driver for windows in the works? :3

CharlesA
October 20th, 2010, 02:03 AM
Got a homepage instead of just a download link?

Lucradia
October 20th, 2010, 03:30 AM
http://www.tweakxp.com/article36702.aspx

Easy fix.

Windows 7: gpedit.msc doesn't exist; nor does Control Panel > Folder Options > View > "Do not cache thumbnails"

As Windows Vista and higher force you to turn off thumbnails in order not to cache them.

CharlesA
October 20th, 2010, 03:34 AM
Windows 7: gpedit.msc doesn't exist; nor does Control Panel > Folder Options > View > "Do not cache thumbnails"

As Windows Vista and higher force you to turn off thumbnails in order not to cache them.

Are you using Home Premium? I've got gpedit.msc on my Win7 Pro and Ultimate installs.

However, I don't see anything under folder options.

Lucradia
October 20th, 2010, 04:23 AM
Are you using Home Premium?

Which is what most pre-built computers, like mine, come with; yes, I am.

Ctrl-Alt-F1
October 20th, 2010, 06:33 AM
As a few others have stated, I prefer that Windows can't read my Linux file system. I don't mind Linux reading my Windows file systems because I trust Linux not to do anything stupid inadvertently.

the8thstar
October 20th, 2010, 06:46 AM
It's good news for people who switch often from one OS to the other on the same computer.

Personally I share the general feeling of *not* wanting to use the ext4 reader because I don't want to risk harming my main system (Ubuntu) while working in a more exposed environment that is more susceptible to attacks because of the sheer number of people using it (Windows).

Starks
October 20th, 2010, 06:54 AM
Got a homepage instead of just a download link?
http://www.acc.umu.se/~bosse/ (http://www.acc.umu.se/%7Ebosse/)

julio_cortez
October 20th, 2010, 08:58 AM
I really hate it when Windows creates those thumb.db files everywhere! That's why I don't like Windows getting access to Linux...You're talking about XP, aren't you? I think it doesn't happen anymore with Windows 7.

By the way, I have the exactly opposite problem: Ubuntu leaves behind those .trash folders in my shared NTFS volume (Data) each time I delete a file, and I have to manually remove them when I boot into Windows.
Not only I wouldn't ever let Windows access an ext4 partition, but I would only let Ubuntu access a NTFS partition which is not a system one. I won't mount my XP or my 7 partition in Ubuntu..

CharlesA
October 20th, 2010, 12:22 PM
http://www.acc.umu.se/~bosse/ (http://www.acc.umu.se/%7Ebosse/)

Thanks. :)


You're talking about XP, aren't you? I think it doesn't happen anymore with Windows 7.

I think Win7 still does it, but the only option you have is to "turn off thumbnails completely" if you have the Home Premium version, since that version doesn't have access to gpedit.msc.

EDIT: You can add a registry entry to prevent the creation of the thumbs.db files:


Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curre ntVersion\Explorer\Advanced]
"DisableThumbnailCache"=dword:00000001

Tested it and it works. Source (http://superuser.com/questions/2345/how-can-i-suppress-those-annoying-thumbs-db-files-in-windows-vista-and-windows-7).

swoll1980
October 20th, 2010, 03:00 PM
I can never get the ext2 driver to work. Explorer always wants me to format my Linux drives when I try to access them. I could never figure out why. It obviously thinks they are empty, and unformatted. Thanks for the link though it was worth another try.

Jose Catre-Vandis
October 20th, 2010, 03:50 PM
I use a shared partition formatted to ntfs. Works well and has been so for the last 12 months. This doesn't give W7 access to my linux filesystem (whereas as linux can see the W7 partition natively), but means I can access "working" files when in either OS seamlessly. Not noticed too much of a problem with thumb files though?

CharlesA
October 20th, 2010, 04:13 PM
I use a shared partition formatted to ntfs. Works well and has been so for the last 12 months. This doesn't give W7 access to my linux filesystem (whereas as linux can see the W7 partition natively), but means I can access "working" files when in either OS seamlessly. Not noticed too much of a problem with thumb files though?

If I am dualbooting, that's what I do as well. Either that or just sftp stuff to/from my server, since I store most of my stuff there.

I haven't noticed a huge "problem" with Thumbs.db files either, I even did a search on my file server for them and it only found a handful of them. The files themselves are tiny, so it's not a huge deal for me.

varmeh
November 7th, 2010, 10:15 AM
Ext2fsd-0.48-bb8 (http://www.acc.umu.se/%7Ebosse/ext2fsd-0.48-bb8.zip) (Support for ext4 extents and fix for BSOD on Windows 7.)

My Windows 7 partition suddenly became more valuable.

Be sure to follow the readme.

would this work for win server 2008 r2? or WHSv2 "vail"?

and how does it compare to:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/ext2read/

thanks for the input. my situation is that i have a huge amount of data (for me anyway, about 1.2 TB) on an ext4 partition that i'd like to slide over to NTFS.

babygenius55
July 17th, 2012, 01:09 PM
http://www.diskinternals.com/linux-reader/

do it. do it now.

sffvba[e0rt
July 17th, 2012, 02:35 PM
Back to sleep old thread.


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