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Donalt2010
October 13th, 2010, 02:37 PM
Ive been messing around with Ubuntu for a good few months now and ive decided to take the plunge and try a different OS, I'm in the process of downloading Fedora 13. So i will dual boot it along with my Ubuntu 10.04 LTS. Hopefully things go nice and smooth for me or I'll just give up lol:)

adwhitenc
October 13th, 2010, 02:41 PM
I run fedora 13 under virtualbox and it runs very similar to ubuntu. I prefer ubuntu but I might be biased because my first linux distro was ubuntu hoary. :)

NightwishFan
October 13th, 2010, 02:41 PM
Please have fun. I find Fedora has an excellent community and a lot of polish.

kaldor
October 13th, 2010, 02:41 PM
Lmde! :)

ronnielsen1
October 13th, 2010, 02:42 PM
Happy distro hopping! Try crunchbang and antiX. They're pretty good

tweakedenigma
October 13th, 2010, 02:48 PM
Lmde! :)

Kaldor you are always pushing LMDE :). It is worth a try though.

For me my second favorite distro is OpenSuse.

kaldor
October 13th, 2010, 02:49 PM
Kaldor you are always pushing LMDE :). It is worth a try though.

For me my second favorite distro is OpenSuse.

Take a hint then, aye? ^^

Yeah, openSuSE will teach you new things.

Donalt2010
October 13th, 2010, 02:54 PM
Take a hint then, aye? ^^

Yeah, openSuSE will teach you new things.

I was gonna download it, but 4.7gb will take a lonnng time to download so I just went with something a little smaller.

Ubuntu will always feel like home to me. And so will these forums:)

andymorton
October 13th, 2010, 02:58 PM
I was gonna download it, but 4.7gb will take a lonnng time to download so I just went with something a little smaller.

Ubuntu will always feel like home to me. And so will these forums:)

You can download the Live CD (Gnome and KDE) which are only about 700MB.

http://software.opensuse.org/113/en

NMFTM
October 13th, 2010, 03:25 PM
If one is going to use an RPM distro, is there any benefit to using Fedora over OpenSuse?

NightwishFan
October 13th, 2010, 03:32 PM
Fedora is usually on top of the bleeding edge of development. In reality though they are quite similar. I would be inclined to try OpenSUSE first.

Donalt2010
October 13th, 2010, 03:33 PM
Well looks like that got stopped dead in its tracks (for now anyway). Didnt really know what to do after the custom partition bit, so I'll do a bit of reading and get back on it some other day.

NightwishFan
October 13th, 2010, 03:37 PM
You can always use Virtualbox to play with distros, that is what I do.

Donalt2010
October 13th, 2010, 03:44 PM
You can always use Virtualbox to play with distros, that is what I do.

Downloaded Virtualbox there, does it run iso files? Seemed to get stumped with Maverick Meerkat straight away.

NightwishFan
October 13th, 2010, 03:59 PM
Virtualbox is very easy to use, and is actually installable from the Ubuntu Software Center. When making a machine, just add the CD device as an ISO instead of transparently using your cd-rom drive.

Donalt2010
October 13th, 2010, 04:35 PM
Ah-ha...Thanks got it sorted there... Now running Fedora 13 in Virtualbox:)

NightwishFan
October 13th, 2010, 04:52 PM
Enjoy! :) I use virtualbox for Haiku and React OS.

ubunterooster
October 13th, 2010, 05:08 PM
Kaldor you are always pushing LMDE :)As I push Igelle: http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=05922 :D

kaldor
October 13th, 2010, 05:19 PM
As I push Igelle: http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=05922 :D


Status: Discontinued

:(

ubunterooster
October 13th, 2010, 05:22 PM
:(
:confused::cry::shock:

It was so nice... When did it die?

cascade9
October 13th, 2010, 05:35 PM
I'm not sure it is dead.


The official Igelle PULSE website will be launched here soon. Featured here will be the latest version of the Igelle PULSE desktop operating system, documentation, details about the system, and information on how you can avail of Igelle for the desktop, as well as what to do if you want to develop and contribute apps, partner in our business, and/or license and distribute our product. For more information regarding Igelle please visit www.igelle.com (http://www.igelle.com/). You can also learn more about Job and Esther Technologies at www.jobandesther.com (http://www.jobandesther.com/).


http://www.igellepulse.com/

Job and Esther technologies (the owner) is still going, www.igelle.com is still up.....its possible that distrowatch ahs made a mistake. Or else Job and Esther technologies has crumbled, or pulled support for igelle and not made an offical announement.

http://www.igelle.com/get-igelle doesnt work however. :|

Fom what I can see, its not my sort of OS, but I hope (if only for your sake ubunterooster) that its not dead.

ubunterooster
October 13th, 2010, 05:39 PM
Thanks

futz
October 13th, 2010, 06:37 PM
Ive been messing around with Ubuntu for a good few months now and ive decided to take the plunge and try a different OS, I'm in the process of downloading Fedora 13. So i will dual boot it along with my Ubuntu 10.04 LTS. Hopefully things go nice and smooth for me or I'll just give up lol:)
Definitely do it if you have the time. You'll learn a lot.

But you may find out, as I did, that after I spent all the time to get each distro comfy for me to use they "became" Ubuntu, sorta. I'd spend days wrestling with them to get them the way I wanted them and end up with pretty much what I got with Ubuntu "out of the box". A lot of work to get something that was running pretty much all the same software anyway. Finally just stopped doing it.

I used to use Fedora, Mint (which is Ubuntu), Sabayon, OpenSUSE, PCLinuxOS, Mandriva, Mepis... and many others.

I still like Fedora, but you'll find that an awful lot of the stuff that's "automatic" in Ubuntu you have to do yourself in Fedora. It's nice, but more work.

NMFTM
October 13th, 2010, 07:19 PM
Virtualbox is very easy to use, and is actually installable from the Ubuntu Software Center
I'd recommend installing the proprietary version from the official site though. It allows you to mount USB devices while the other doesn't. Useful if you need to exchange files without emailing them to yourself and opening it up in the VM's browser.

tweakedenigma
October 13th, 2010, 07:40 PM
I'd recommend installing the proprietary version from the official site though. It allows you to mount USB devices while the other doesn't. Useful if you need to exchange files without emailing them to yourself and opening it up in the VM's browser.

I always just created a shared file and pulled it over that way. Isn't supper quick but it was easy.

NightwishFan
October 14th, 2010, 01:59 AM
I'd recommend installing the proprietary version from the official site though. It allows you to mount USB devices while the other doesn't. Useful if you need to exchange files without emailing them to yourself and opening it up in the VM's browser.

I create a data .iso image and mount it in the VM. :)

kaldor
October 14th, 2010, 03:15 AM
I always just created a shared file and pulled it over that way. Isn't supper quick but it was easy.

This.

TriBlox6432
October 14th, 2010, 03:24 AM
I support you in this. Everyone should try several distro's IMO. How do you know the one you are currently using is the best for you? I have tried most of the "popular" ones today, and Ubuntu is what I want, so I use it. :)

Khakilang
October 14th, 2010, 05:31 AM
I don't dual boot on my main computer just simply because I don't want to mess thing up. So i use an older computer to test other Distros to see how it perform on older machine. I have try Fedora 13, Open Suse, Debian and now currently using PCLinuxOS.

NightwishFan
October 14th, 2010, 05:38 AM
I like having one system per device even though there are sometimes advantages to having more than one. I always use a Live CD/USB to test my hardware and Vbox if I only want to test the software.

johntaylor1887
October 14th, 2010, 05:52 AM
Definitely do it if you have the time. You'll learn a lot.

But you may find out, as I did, that after I spent all the time to get each distro comfy for me to use they "became" Ubuntu, sorta. I'd spend days wrestling with them to get them the way I wanted them and end up with pretty much what I got with Ubuntu "out of the box". A lot of work to get something that was running pretty much all the same software anyway. Finally just stopped doing it.

I used to use Fedora, Mint (which is Ubuntu), Sabayon, OpenSUSE, PCLinuxOS, Mandriva, Mepis... and many others.

I still like Fedora, but you'll find that an awful lot of the stuff that's "automatic" in Ubuntu you have to do yourself in Fedora. It's nice, but more work.

I feel exactly the same way. I spent a lot of time trying to get other distros to behave just like ubuntu. In the end, I wound up reinstalling ubuntu and have been happy ever since. But I still like to check out new live CD's or install other distros in virtualbox once in a while.

futz
October 14th, 2010, 07:16 AM
I feel exactly the same way. I spent a lot of time trying to get other distros to behave just like ubuntu. In the end, I wound up reinstalling ubuntu and have been happy ever since. But I still like to check out new live CD's or install other distros in virtualbox once in a while.
Yup, I have Debian Squeeze and Pardus in my VirtualBox right now. Always like to have a look at the competition. :D

danbuter
October 14th, 2010, 08:06 AM
Make sure you keep a stable distro available, if you only have one computer. Fedora has crashed hard on me a couple times after an update. It's called bleeding edge for a reason.

Spice Weasel
October 14th, 2010, 10:38 AM
Make sure you keep a stable distro available, if you only have one computer. Fedora has crashed hard on me a couple times after an update. It's called bleeding edge for a reason.

That's the beauty of rolling release, you can control how stable or not it is. Just do bug + security updates and only do complete updates occasionally and you'll find it will be quite stable (not anything like like RHEL, Debian or Cent OS though).