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CommuneOfLoon
October 12th, 2010, 03:46 AM
I know there's GIMP, but does it have all the functionality of the CS suite (Illustrator, Dreamweaver, etc)? Are there other alternatives?

Thanks.

CommuneOfLoon
October 12th, 2010, 03:52 PM
Is this the wrong forum to ask this question?

Ctrl-Alt-F1
October 12th, 2010, 04:03 PM
To answer your question: No, there is not a perfect alternative to Adobe. GIMP is a very powerful tool, having used both I prefer it to Photoshop sometimes. Other times I prefer Photoshop.

There isn't a complete suite with standard tools, like CS. For vector graphics there is inkscape, but to be honest I can't make heads or tails of that after using Illustrator!

Don't give up on Gimp for Raster images though. It's really a neat program and fast, but it does take some learning.

cipherboy_loc
October 12th, 2010, 04:06 PM
Yes, and no. As for Dreamweaver, their are WYSIWYG HTML editors for GNU/Linux, bluefish (sudo apt-get install bluefish) being the one I have installed. I cannot say that I use it, preferring to use EMACS, Vim, Nano, or GEdit for my coding work.

I don't know exactly what Illustrator does (a quick google suggests that its a vector graphic tool), but for the little amount of tracing and creating of artwork I use inkscape (sudo apt-get install inkscape). It is a scalable vector graphic tool, but on my old and slow system often takes a while to load.


I don't know off the top of my head what the other CS suite applications are, but if you give me a list, and a short description of what it does, I should be able to come up with a list of applications that run on GNU/Linux.


Whoops.. Someone beat me by 2 minutes.... :)

Ctrl-Alt-F1
October 12th, 2010, 04:17 PM
It's all good. The more the merrier. I've never used a WYSIWYG editor for Linux because I prefer to do coding in a text editor (actually I prefer not to do web work at all, because I don't have the patience for design).

As far as I'm aware there isn't a replacement for Adobe InDesign either.

I've never tried it but some of these apps might run in wine (runs windows applications).

CommuneOfLoon
October 12th, 2010, 06:54 PM
Okay, thanks. I'll be checking those programs out.

In terms of other CS programs, I guess I should have specified that the ones I mentioned (Photoshop, Illustrator, and Dreamweaver) were the only ones I was interested in :)

Dragonbite
October 12th, 2010, 07:07 PM
While they don't quite match (those made for KDE do work in Gnome. They look a little different but the capabilities are not diminished):


Photoshop (pixel editing) => Gimp, Krita (KDE)
Illustrator (SVG editing) => Inkscape, Karbon14 (KDE), Xara Xtreme
Dreamweaver (WYSIWYG) => Kompozer, Quanta Plus (KDE), SeaMonkey
InDesign (Desktop Publishing) => Scribus, KWrite, OpenOffice.org Writer
Acrobat (PDF) => I've heard OpenOffice.org Writer can open, edit and save PDFs, but I haven't tried it yet.
Flex = Flex
Acrobat Reader => Evince, Adobe Acrobat Reader, Okular (KDE)

That's all I can think of off the top of my head.

the big e
February 16th, 2011, 04:31 AM
I have Scribus but I am disappointed in it. (I have a background in Quark Xpress, and that shapes my expectations.)

So if there are others out there with similar functionality I would love to know.

Scribus doesn't do jumplinks, I was disappointed.

Also the "stable" version fails to place the cursor in a text frame, and it lost me right there.

So if anyone knows something else good out there I would be happy to hear it.

Hoopz
February 16th, 2011, 05:05 AM
http://www.linuxalt.com/

Dragonbite
February 16th, 2011, 03:17 PM
I have Scribus but I am disappointed in it. (I have a background in Quark Xpress, and that shapes my expectations.)

So if there are others out there with similar functionality I would love to know.

Scribus doesn't do jumplinks, I was disappointed.

Also the "stable" version fails to place the cursor in a text frame, and it lost me right there.

So if anyone knows something else good out there I would be happy to hear it.

While it is nowhere nearly as powerful as an actual desktop publisher, KOffice's KWrite includes some features for a more desktop publisher~esque feel. Other than that, I would love to hear of some other desktop publisher program for Linux.