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WhatAreHackers
August 17th, 2010, 03:57 AM
Hello... I never took courses for computers in my school, i'm not going back to school and i'm very garbage at computers... but what i want to know is: where can i find a good place to learn this computer mumbo jumbo like c++, java, java script, html, or bash?? --btw... what's the difference between java and javascript

Legendary_Bibo
August 17th, 2010, 04:21 AM
I would learn Python if I were you. It's a language that makes it easier to grasp how to program because it's light on the silly syntax rules that C++ loves so much.

There are lots of resources for learning how to program. There's a PDF that makes it easy to learn how to program through Python.

You can download it here (www.greenteapress.com/thinkpython/thinkCSpy.pdf)

Jazzy_Jeff
August 17th, 2010, 04:21 AM
You can find a lot of information on this if you do a search on Google.

Ozymandias_117
August 17th, 2010, 04:23 AM
Hello... I never took courses for computers in my school, i'm not going back to school and i'm very garbage at computers... but what i want to know is: where can i find a good place to learn this computer mumbo jumbo like c++, java, java script, html, or bash?? --btw... what's the difference between java and javascript

Java is a programming language, javascript is a scripting language used on websites.

C++: http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/lesson1.html

C: http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/c/lesson1.html

Bash: http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Bash-Prog-Intro-HOWTO.html

Bash too: http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/

HTML: http://www.w3schools.com/html/default.asp

Python: http://wiki.python.org/moin/BeginnersGuide

Python too: http://www.greenteapress.com/thinkpython/thinkpython.html

Legendary_Bibo
August 17th, 2010, 04:29 AM
Also programming languages aren't mumbo jumbo. If you know how to use them then you can basically utilize your computer in any way you want. It's a rather useful skill.

darolu
August 17th, 2010, 04:47 AM
Hello... I never took courses for computers in my school, i'm not going back to school and i'm very garbage at computers... but what i want to know is: where can i find a good place to learn this computer mumbo jumbo like c++, java, java script, html, or bash?? --btw... what's the difference between java and javascript
There are many differences between java and javascript, actually the only thing they have in common is the "java", which leads to questions like yours. The first and probably most important difference is that javascript is an interpreted language (it needs an interpreter) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interpreter_(computing)) and java is a program that needs to be compiled (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compiler) in order to work as a bytecode (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bytecode) which can be used by an interpreter or further (re-)compilation in machine code. It's OK if you didn't understand these concepts, don't worry you will; in other words it means that... javascript can be executed "on-the-fly" while java needs to be 'translated' to computers' language first. The important thing is that you understand that some languages are interpreted languages (like javascript) and others need to be 'translated' (like java or C).

There is a third language: mark up language; this one is very common and I strongly recommend that you start with one of these as they are easy and will introduce you to how other languages can be; examples of mark up languages are HTML and XML, I'm pretty sure you have heard of them; I recommend this site to learn them: http://www.w3schools.com are very simple, and you will see immediate results as all you have to do is open them in your browser :) same with javascript which leads to the second kind of language you may want to learn: interpreted languages, javascript is a good one to start, and then (as some have already told you) python and even perl. In the 'in-between' you may like to learn PHP too, one of my favourite web languages (I love its arrays). There are plenty of websites to learn them; finally you'll end learning (and loving) more sophisticated languages like C and C++, which are really powerful and flexible languages.

Legendary_Bibo
August 17th, 2010, 04:58 AM
Also some tools we could recommend to you if you're using Linux is Geany for script programs (text based programs that run in a terminal), Glade for making graphical programs, and there's others. It's pretty easy to use. They support multiple languages so you don't have to worry too much. I personally like Gambas because it's very similar to Visual Basic, and for me that's easier to understand. Although I don't know if programs you make with Gambas will run on other peoples' computers unless they install Gambas.

WhatAreHackers
August 17th, 2010, 05:03 AM
ty everyone, i have read everyones comment up until this current one and i'll take a look at all the sites you guys/gals provided. -.- and i'm too lazy to help anyone out with signing up or whatever

Legendary_Bibo
August 17th, 2010, 05:08 AM
i'm too lazy to help anyone out with signing up or whatever

Those are peoples' signatures. It shows up on every post. :)

WhatAreHackers
August 17th, 2010, 03:35 PM
Those are peoples' signatures. It shows up on every post. :)

yes i'm very aware of that actually, i have my own signature 2