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View Full Version : My CD's are all FLAC'ed Up!



Shibblet
May 3rd, 2010, 06:18 PM
Apparently I'm a bit slow to this whole technology thing, but I finally took the time to encode all of my CD's to FLAC format.

The amazing part about this, is the ones on my HD can be played back at any time, and if I want to convert them to MP3 with Sound Converter, I can throw them on my iPod!

My question is...

If a cd is about ~700megs, is it pretty standard for a FLAC Album to be around ~350megs? Some of my FLAC Rips are ~500megs.

I had a friend tell me that FLAC is bigger than MP3, but not that much bigger.

cascade9
May 3rd, 2010, 06:26 PM
My question is...

If a cd is about ~700megs, is it pretty standard for a FLAC Album to be around ~350megs? Some of my FLAC Rips are ~500megs.

I had a friend tell me that FLAC is bigger than MP3, but not that much bigger.

For a full 700MB CD (80 minutes) I'd expect about 400MB, normally. This will depend on what compression you use, -1 is the biggest, -8 the smallest.

The style of music will also make a big difference, the more 'minimal' the music, the smaller the bitrate (and the filesize) and the noiser, the bigger.

NightwishFan
May 3rd, 2010, 07:13 PM
I have my music collection in nothing less than FLAC. I tend to get as said above 400mb for a CD. An mp3 will probably be 5-10 times smaller, but unless you are short on space, you can have lossless backups of all your CD and DVD audio. Some portable devices even support FLAC. :)

'Spared no expense.' - John Hammond

ssam
May 3rd, 2010, 08:09 PM
no lossless compression can compress anything. noise (as in white noise, not sound) is hard to compress as it has no patterns. so classical will probably make smaller files than rock.

if you use rhythmbox to transfer music to a media play it will automatically convert the files to something the media play can play. you can use an .is_audio_player file if you want more control http://live.gnome.org/Rhythmbox/FAQ

samalex
May 3rd, 2010, 08:45 PM
I've never used FLAC, but it sounds like the file sizes are huge. I don't have a very sensitive ear I guess because most of my MP3's are coded at 160K to 320K and they sound fine and have pretty small file sizes at generally 5 to 10 Megs each.

Why is FLAC starting to be come the format of choice for so many? Is it mainly because it's FOSS? Just curious...

Sam

eriktheblu
May 3rd, 2010, 09:04 PM
Why is FLAC starting to be come the format of choice for so many? Is it mainly because it's FOSS? Just curious... Because it's FOSS, and it's lossless.

Storage becomes less of an issue every year. Back when HDDs were 10-40 GB range, compression was key to storing your entire library. Now with disks in the terabytes, it's not that big a deal.

nothingspecial
May 3rd, 2010, 09:09 PM
Apparently I'm a bit slow to this whole technology thing, but I finally took the time to encode all of my CD's to FLAC format.

The amazing part about this, is the ones on my HD can be played back at any time, and if I want to convert them to MP3 with Sound Converter, I can throw them on my iPod!

My question is...

If a cd is about ~700megs, is it pretty standard for a FLAC Album to be around ~350megs? Some of my FLAC Rips are ~500megs.

I had a friend tell me that FLAC is bigger than MP3, but not that much bigger.

Good for you! :D

Now, back them up and throw the cds in the attic. You have an accurate digital copy of them. You can stream them, convert them .... do what you will with them, but as long as you have them, you don`t need the cds.

Sporkman
May 3rd, 2010, 10:04 PM
Storage becomes less of an issue every year. Back when HDDs were 10-40 GB range, compression was key to storing your entire library. Now with disks in the terabytes, it's not that big a deal.

Agreed. On a related note: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1400498

Shibblet
May 4th, 2010, 07:52 AM
And an even more related note...

http://arstechnica.com/media/news/2009/03/new-lossless-mp3hd-format-trades-convenience-for-file-size.ars

I don't know the reasoning behind this besides compatibility. I have a 30meg 3 minute MP3 file that works on my iPod, but I can't play the lossless, just the compressed core... USEFUL.

This is the way Dolby TrueHD, and DTS HD Master Audio formats work. In the case of Blu-Ray, this makes sense. If your receiver doesn't have DTHD or DTSHDMA, then you can still hear sound from your movie, or television set.

And on an unrelated note. 10.04 is the crowning achievement in Ubuntu's legacy. Lucid Rocks.