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L Campbell
January 29th, 2010, 08:52 PM
I have the ubuntu-8.04.4-desktop-i386.iso on my desktop but when I try to get the MD5sum for it, I get this message:-

qwer@qwer-desktop:~$ md5sum ubuntu-8.04.4-desktop-i386.iso
md5sum: ubuntu-8.04.4-desktop-i386.iso: No such file or directory

I would appreciate your help here

TIA

Mornedhel
January 29th, 2010, 08:55 PM
This seems to be confusing for new users, but when you start a terminal, the default working directory is not the Desktop. Instead, it's the user's home directory (indicated by the tilde "~"). The user's Desktop is in the home directory, so you need to


cd Desktop

first. Then you should be able to see the files stored there.

Rex Bouwense
January 29th, 2010, 08:59 PM
You probably downloaded 8.04 to your downloads, which probably is a directory inside of documents. Anyway see https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowToMD5SUM#Check%20the%20iso%20file.
That should help you out.

tom.swartz07
January 29th, 2010, 09:17 PM
I have the ubuntu-8.04.4-desktop-i386.iso on my desktop but when I try to get the MD5sum for it, I get this message:-

qwer@qwer-desktop:~$ md5sum ubuntu-8.04.4-desktop-i386.iso
md5sum: ubuntu-8.04.4-desktop-i386.iso: No such file or directory

I would appreciate your help here

TIA

The easiest way to make sure that you have the correct thing is to hit TAB

for example, change your directory to Desktop

cd Des<TAB>
will give you

cd /home/username/Desktop/

Same applies to your md5sum

md5sum ubu<TAB>
should complete it to your file. If it doesnt, then somethings wrong.

L Campbell
January 29th, 2010, 09:59 PM
This seems to be confusing for new users, but when you start a terminal, the default working directory is not the Desktop. Instead, it's the user's home directory (indicated by the tilde "~"). The user's Desktop is in the home directory, so you need to


cd Desktop

first. Then you should be able to see the files stored there.

Thanks, frankly I'm still confused but it worked.

4f41e03d250b2f2b1cd3015c8df4af7c

I appreciate the help.

SoftwareExplorer
January 29th, 2010, 10:05 PM
When you press tab in the terminal, it tries to guess what you are going to type from what you already typed and puts it in for you. It guesses from what would be the valid options for you to type, so it's a good way to make sure that the folder you are trying to change to actually exists.
The 'cd' command changes the directory (folder) the terminal is running in. So when you type cd <TAB> it will try to guess from what folders are in the folder you are currently in. You you can also list the files in the current folder with the command
ls.

tom.swartz07
January 29th, 2010, 10:44 PM
Thanks, frankly I'm still confused but it worked.

4f41e03d250b2f2b1cd3015c8df4af7c

I appreciate the help.

Do you know how to compare them?
If you check the ubuntu site, theres a list of checksums for each download.

you compare this long string of numbers to the checksum you get after you finish downloading it to make sure that you have a 'full download'. Sometimes the download has errors (theres a lot of chances for it to get one)

Anyway- according to this site: http://releases.ubuntu.com/hardy/MD5SUMS

4f41e03d250b2f2b1cd3015c8df4af7c *ubuntu-8.04.4-desktop-i386.iso
Should be the checksum you get, and it looks like everything is all clear!

L Campbell
January 30th, 2010, 12:23 AM
Do you know how to compare them?
If you check the ubuntu site, theres a list of checksums for each download.

you compare this long string of numbers to the checksum you get after you finish downloading it to make sure that you have a 'full download'. Sometimes the download has errors (theres a lot of chances for it to get one)

Anyway- according to this site: http://releases.ubuntu.com/hardy/MD5SUMS

4f41e03d250b2f2b1cd3015c8df4af7c *ubuntu-8.04.4-desktop-i386.iso
Should be the checksum you get, and it looks like everything is all clear!

Thanks for taking the time to write such a clear explanation.

Kind regards.

egalvan
January 30th, 2010, 12:38 AM
I downloaded these Nautilus scripts back in m Hardy days.
"Open Terminal Here" is one of the scripts.
Just highlight a file or directory, right-click and "open a terminal there". It' a great time saver.

And the pack also includes a "Show md5sum" script.

http://www.ubuntu-unleashed.com/2007/09/125-nautilus-scripts-to-simplify.html


note: these scripts do nothing to hone your command-line skills :)
but they sure are handy!

tom.swartz07
January 30th, 2010, 12:49 AM
Thanks for taking the time to write such a clear explanation.

Kind regards.

Sure! Thats what we're here for, after all! :P

Enjoy!