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s0c0
November 28th, 2009, 10:55 AM
In the windows world I would use NotePad++ so I am looking for something with similar functionality. The big thing I am looking for in my text editor is syntax highlighting, especially SQL syntax.

Virtual Liberty
November 28th, 2009, 11:04 AM
Have you tried Gedit and jEdit ?

SNYP40A1
November 28th, 2009, 11:43 AM
In the windows world I would use NotePad++ so I am looking for something with similar functionality. The big thing I am looking for in my text editor is syntax highlighting, especially SQL syntax.

Yeah, Notepad++ is really good. Wish there was a Linux version. You could probably run it in Wine.

jzacsh
November 28th, 2009, 11:46 AM
Yeah, Notepad++ is really good. Wish there was a Linux version. You could probably run it in Wine.

Run it in Wine?... I thought Notepad++ was open sourced..?

ibuclaw
November 28th, 2009, 12:07 PM
Run it in Wine?... I thought Notepad++ was open sourced..?

Open Source != Will Run on Linux.

Notepad++ uses a set of functions/routines that are Windows API specific.
That's not to say that it can't be ported over - you just need to rewrite a large chunk of it so that you get the same interface except in GTK or QT.

jzacsh
November 28th, 2009, 12:18 PM
Open Source != Will Run on Linux.

Notepad++ uses a set of functions/routines that are Windows API specific.
That's not to say that it can't be ported over - you just need to rewrite a large chunk of it so that you get the same interface except in GTK or QT.

Yes, I was considering it, but... just allowing the whole GUI side of the programming to slip by my thoughts. Quite important though :)

sorry, a bit off topic: does the interface really make up so much of the code (I haven't learned to write anything outside of the command line yet) that its a big deal to port??

back to answer your question:
I dont' know about SQL syntax, but you can try Bluefish. I mostly use vim. it has a learning curve, but if you spend a lot of time with text files, you might feel its worth it. It also has syntax highlighting (and a ton of other countless whistles).

leandromartinez98
November 28th, 2009, 12:55 PM
xemacs, gvim, nedit?

qalimas
November 29th, 2009, 03:43 AM
Depends on your DE.

KDE's KATE is a great text editor included in the KDE suite.

s0c0
November 29th, 2009, 04:21 AM
gEdit did not provide syntax highlight (at least not that I could tell). There was a simple editor I used to program in years back and I believe it was kde specific back when I was on debian+kde. I am downloading kate now, hopefully thats what I am thinking of. If that doesn't do it for me I'll look into jedit, thanks.

falconindy
November 29th, 2009, 05:03 AM
I just recently got rid of Gedit and Geany. I'm 100% Vim. Do a little bit of research. Among other things, Vim will do:

-syntax highlighting
-flawless column select
-search/replace with pattern matching
-macros
-word completion
-multiple documents, tabbed or tiled (they're called buffers)
-built in compiling tools
-text manipulation (e.g. changing case, transposing lines)

Yes, the learning curve is vertical, but its been worth sticking with it. I keep my trusty Vim cheat sheet nearby.

maximinus_uk
November 29th, 2009, 03:41 PM
Your question is a bit like asking a sample of sports fans who the best team is.

However, it can be replied in a simple way: there a great number of text editors, and they differ in only a few simple ways, and probably whatever is on your system - GEdit, Kate or whatever - will do what you want.

If, on the other hand, you are going to use a text editor on a regular basis, then you should learn either VIM or EMACS. You'll probably hate both at first but it's the truth. Try both and see how you get on :p

Barriehie
November 29th, 2009, 04:28 PM
...muted...
If, on the other hand, you are going to use a text editor on a regular basis, then you should learn either VIM or EMACS. You'll probably hate both at first but it's the truth. Try both and see how you get on :p

+1 My emacs cheat sheet grows weekly but I couldn't use any other at this point!

Barrie

hessiess
November 29th, 2009, 04:32 PM
If, on the other hand, you are going to use a text editor on a regular basis, then you should learn either VIM or EMACS. You'll probably hate both at first but it's the truth. Try both and see how you get on


This, Im a Vim guy personally;)

sgosnell
November 29th, 2009, 04:34 PM
Gedit does do syntax highlighting, for many languages/environments. You may need to enable some plugins through the menus.

jpkotta
November 29th, 2009, 06:58 PM
xemacs, gvim, nedit?

I like nedit, as a notepad-like application. It is not too hard to make your own syntax highlighting mode.

I use GNU Emacs. I used to use XEmacs, but it ended up being too crashy for me. The only things I miss are the horizontal scroll bars and the superior tab mode (but ido (http://www.emacswiki.org/emacs/InteractivelyDoThings) is far better than tabs anyway). Later I came across this and it sums it up perfectly: http://steve-yegge.blogspot.com/2008/04/xemacs-is-dead-long-live-xemacs.html.

Cavsfan
December 7th, 2009, 10:15 PM
Was on a website the other day and tried to look at a xxxxx.txt file.
I double clicked on it and it said I needed to download an add-on to read it?

That kind of confused me; any one know what I should do here?
I usually use gedit as it came with Karmic. But, the web page could not use gedit.
Thanks!

jpmelos
December 8th, 2009, 12:24 AM
GEdit does syntax highlighting out of the box. Just open a file with the correct extension or choose the correct language/environment on the lower bar.

But I totally recommend Vim.

As I use to say:


Learn Linux and you are free.
Learn Vim and you are free of distribution. Whatever UNIX system will suffice.
Learn LaTeX and you are free of office platforms. No more Microsoft Office, OpenOffice or whatever. No more WYSIWYG. No more losing pictures, no more things moving around misteriously.


That is freedom. Any computer you touch will suffice your needs.