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View Full Version : [ubuntu] Can someone tell me what ubuntu one is for?



Supertramp1138
November 20th, 2009, 10:04 AM
Ok so what is ubuntu one and what is it used for?
I went to a site and it said something about a $10 a month subscription fee?

YosefKaro
November 20th, 2009, 10:14 AM
ubuntu one is ubuntu's first step into 'cloud computing' where data and files are no longer stored on your computer but 'in the clouds' that is, on the internet. ubuntu one is free and you can try it out up to 2Gb of data. I'm new to this too and I am looking forward to learning much about this as this is the direction that the future of computing is heading...to the 'clouds'.

-Yos

Check out this site (https://one.ubuntu.com/) on ubuntu one. You only have to pay $10/mo if you want 50Gb of space.

emigrant
November 20th, 2009, 10:16 AM
i would like to know, how secure is this in terms of privacy.

Supertramp1138
November 20th, 2009, 10:20 AM
i would like to know, how secure is this in terms of privacy.
I would like to know as well

YosefKaro
November 20th, 2009, 10:42 AM
Cloud computing is new to practically all of us and security is everyone's first concern about this novelty. I followed the lecture that was given about ubuntu one on IRC during open week. I don't remember exactly how the lecturer answered this question but I do remember that his answer put all of us at ease regarding the security of cloud computing. That is, no one can access your data that you upload unless you choose to share it with other individuals.

-Yos

JBAlaska
November 20th, 2009, 10:47 AM
Well, I wouldn't put my credit card number or pictures of naked animals on it lol.

manoriax
November 20th, 2009, 10:54 AM
Well, I wouldn't put my credit card number or pictures of naked animals on it lol.

Why didn't you tell me beforehand? Damn it. :D

YosefKaro
November 20th, 2009, 11:02 AM
Only if you want to share your credit card info with others ;)

Kellemora
November 20th, 2009, 05:50 PM
I haven't stuck my nose in here for about 3 months now, since everything has been working perfectly for me.
Just popped in to see if I could find out if a new LTS version is stable yet.

Saw this and HAD to have a looks see!

My question would be, WHY would someone PAY a monthly fee to store data off-site at such an exorbitant rate?????

10 bucks a month for 50 gigs, if I read that right.

If you need external storage space for some reason, why not go through your existing ISP? Most give you around 20 to 25 gigs for FREE, then additional storage space is only like 2 bucks a year for each addnl 25 gigs.

I use 500 gig external HD's as mirrors, one on-site, one off-site.
HD's are CHEAP these days!

I guess I'm missing the purpose of this Ubuntu One?

TTUL
Gary

emigrant
November 20th, 2009, 08:06 PM
I guess I'm missing the purpose of this Ubuntu One?

TTUL
Gary

i think one of the purpose is accessibility; you cannot carry your external drive where ever you go right?:popcorn:

QIII
November 20th, 2009, 09:10 PM
Compress, encrypt, strong password. The same security measures you should take anyway.

The amount allowed for free seems a pittance on the face of it and, as stated, your ISP likely provides a pretty fair amount for free.

This is just a first step. Remember that you are not paying for other services that this is bundled with. This isn't a "loss leader" to entice you into other fantastically overpriced services.

ticopelp
November 22nd, 2009, 05:46 PM
Well, I wouldn't put my credit card number or pictures of naked animals on it lol.

Animals wearing clothes are ok though right?

lehkost
November 22nd, 2009, 08:20 PM
For what it's worth, this is how I use Ubuntu One.

In Ubuntu Desktop, I deleted my Documents folder from "Places", renamed the Ubuntu One folder "Documents". I did this on both my desktop and my netbook.

Since I don't do a whole lot of work with large document files, it's an ideal place for me to keep some spreadsheets and other documents I'm working on, but might want to update quickly while I'm on the run.

When I get home, the updates have been downloaded to my desktop machine, and I'm ready to continue work without use of a physical drive that has to be loaded over at every time I need it.

Just my two cents. I dunno.

Vishal Agarwal
November 23rd, 2009, 12:46 PM
Can multiple files be loaded at once ?

vincenzo.disomma
November 23rd, 2009, 05:07 PM
From the desktop you can place all the files you like in Ubuntu One or a subfolder and they will be uploaded automatically.

vincenzo.disomma
November 23rd, 2009, 05:11 PM
I would like to know as well
For the moment you should care about your privacy by yourself encrypting private data before uploading, you can take a look at:
https://bugs.edge.launchpad.net/ubuntuone-servers/+bug/375289

Grenage
November 23rd, 2009, 05:13 PM
I think it's handy. 2GB holds a lot of config files!


Animals wearing clothes are ok though right?

As long as they aren't budgies!

vincenzo.disomma
November 23rd, 2009, 05:14 PM
I haven't stuck my nose in here for about 3 months now, since everything has been working perfectly for me.
Just popped in to see if I could find out if a new LTS version is stable yet.

Saw this and HAD to have a looks see!

My question would be, WHY would someone PAY a monthly fee to store data off-site at such an exorbitant rate?????

10 bucks a month for 50 gigs, if I read that right.

If you need external storage space for some reason, why not go through your existing ISP? Most give you around 20 to 25 gigs for FREE, then additional storage space is only like 2 bucks a year for each addnl 25 gigs.

I use 500 gig external HD's as mirrors, one on-site, one off-site.
HD's are CHEAP these days!

I guess I'm missing the purpose of this Ubuntu One?

TTUL
Gary
Ubuntu One storage allows you to share files with other people, to share files between all the computers you like and access them trough the web. Plus you can sync your contact and your notes and more services will come soon.

upwinger
November 23rd, 2009, 06:31 PM
Have you noticed how cheap flash drives are becoming? You can buy a 16 GB FD for $20 if you shop around. I dont think $10 a month is very cost effective IMHO.

Also, MSN has something called "Skydrive" which allows you to upload 25 GB of files which you can share with others or keep locked in a folder... all for free if you have a free MSN email account, which is free.

lisati
November 23rd, 2009, 06:50 PM
Well, I wouldn't put my credit card number or pictures of naked animals on it lol.
Just the sort of think I'd have to think about for a couple of videos I've uploaded to Youtub. The dolphins here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pB7TYjF8UV8) are naked so it might not be suitable but the cats here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGjIIpuD4nQ) are clothed in fur. I'm not saving my credit card numbers either. The spammers will have to make do with sending me gifts by Paypal, not that suggesting to them that this is an option has done any good so far.


Have you noticed how cheap flash drives are becoming? You can buy a 16 GB FD for $20 if you shop around. I dont think $10 a month is very cost effective IMHO.
<snip>
+1. Using memory sticks and data disks works well for me most of the time, on the rare occasions I share files with other people.

bknhnd
November 23rd, 2009, 08:18 PM
Ubuntu One is basically "skydrive" for Ubuntu, but I haven't even been able to access it. On KK, all it says is Loading... and I can't add any files to it.

Xog
November 23rd, 2009, 11:07 PM
I uploaded a movie to a friend's cloud. So cool :)

raptortech97
November 24th, 2009, 12:04 AM
One reason I like it is that you can automatically move entire folders in, whereas on most online storage centers, you must select each file manually.

Marti68
November 24th, 2009, 11:11 PM
Have you noticed how cheap flash drives are becoming? You can buy a 16 GB FD for $20 if you shop around........

Also, MSN has something called "Skydrive" which allows you to upload 25 GB of files.....

I did try it as 2Gb is the same as the USB stick in the back of my wallet (too small to loose much if it walked) and U-one could be the USB I can't loose. Unfortunately, I never did get Ubuntu One working (the key ring add-on just hangs the browser) and thanks to this post :) found MSN et-al before I wasted too much time on it.

TerraPosse
November 28th, 2009, 11:36 AM
I too was quite sceptical when a friend told me about a similar service, DropBox. But now that I have been using it for a few months I'm won over. Having my files updated and synchronised over several platforms and computers is fantastic. No more scratching my head trying to figure which file was the last version. ;)

Given the problems many seem to face using Ubuntu One, I'll stick with DropBox for the time being since it's the same amount for free.

Raffles10
November 30th, 2009, 08:26 PM
I was deterred from subscribing by their T&C's:


9. Collection and use of your data. We may collect certain non-personally-identifiable information, which is located on your computer. The information collected may include statistics relating to how often data is transferred, and performance metrics in relation to software and configuration. You agree this information may be retained and used by Canonical. Canonical may disclose any or all personal data and contents you have sent, posted or published if required to comply with applicable law or the order or requirement of a court, administrative agency or other governmental body. All other use of your personal data is subject to the Ubuntu One privacy policy.

Maybe I'm just paranoid but whenever I read stuff like that I get worried. It's so MS.... :-k

aikiwolfie
December 2nd, 2009, 02:59 PM
Cloud computing is new to practically all of us and security is everyone's first concern about this novelty. I followed the lecture that was given about ubuntu one on IRC during open week. I don't remember exactly how the lecturer answered this question but I do remember that his answer put all of us at ease regarding the security of cloud computing. That is, no one can access your data that you upload unless you choose to share it with other individuals.

-Yos

If you've ever used any on-line storage at all or even an IRC channel or chat service then you've used cloud computing. It's not new except in name. Examples of on-line storage? Web space. Do you have a web site? MySpace account? Facebook account, Twitter account? YouTube Account? Accounts with any web forum that lets you upload or publish something. Including Ubuntu Forums.

The cloud is nothing more than a re-branding of the Internet, World Wide Web and the clinet-server model in general.

newbuntuxx
December 2nd, 2009, 05:19 PM
If they made it $10.00 per year, then I would probably get a 50 Gig account.

dexter_cro
December 3rd, 2009, 07:37 PM
i think one of the purpose is accessibility; you cannot carry your external drive where ever you go right?

Good answer.
I think that cloud computing is a new step in computer age...
It is said that in time you won't even need a PC to access your data, you'll only need a keyboard,mouse, display and a power cord(for power and to be connected to Internet trough it)...

pirlouis
December 4th, 2009, 07:34 AM
I was deterred from subscribing by their T&C's:



Maybe I'm just paranoid but whenever I read stuff like that I get worried. It's so MS.... :-k

Dunno. Sounds like common sense. The article basically says they want to monitor performance and will give your data to a court if legally required to do so. Nothing 1984ish to my eyes. Like stated earlier, use encryption and you should be fine.

peter d
December 5th, 2009, 12:02 AM
As I understand it you need to b e using an Ubuntu machine to access the data.

I would have thought that it would be much more useful if the data can be accessed from any machine via a web browser.

Странник
December 8th, 2009, 05:11 PM
You can manipulate your files from the browser, It is possible

Down_with_Windows
December 9th, 2009, 02:55 AM
Cloud computing is available for several reasons. I believe it is going to catch on.

For small businesses that do not want the hassle of keeping up a server, they can rent out server space and allow access to website and product information to likely customers.

Also, if you run a business that has multiple travelling employees that need to update a common work record, they can literally access a cloud server from any WiFi hot spot, or cellular net book.

xiaobao1
December 11th, 2009, 12:49 PM
i think it likes BT ,we do not need servers in future ,we can download everything among ubuntu users

Krovas
December 20th, 2009, 11:49 PM
I was wondering about "Ubuntu One". Personally, I think you have to have a screw or two loose to go for this cloud computing crap. I'll be out of Ubuntu long before Ubuntu enters the cloud, thank you.

ctdahle
December 21st, 2009, 04:17 AM
Krovas, that's pretty backward thinking for someone progressive enough to be using Linux. Anyway, for enterprises, the cloud is the future and compared to the rival offerings from MS and Google, Canonical is leaps and bounds ahead of the game with Ubuntu One. They have implemented all of the advantages of cloud storage (access to your files wherever you go) without incorporating the biggest flaw (no access to your files if you cannot connect to the internet)

Up until two weeks ago I was carrying a flash drive on a lanyard around my neck and frequently forgetting it either at home or at the office. Not exactly secure!

Recently, I set Ubuntu One as my default document directory for Open Office. I love it. To OpenOffice and Evolution, it looks exactly like any other directory, except that everything in my Ubuntu One directory is automatically mirrored to a server out there in internet land, so that when I work on a document at home and then save it, it's saved on my home machine and mirrored to Ubuntu One.

When I go to the office and boot my office machine, I have access to exactly the same document and any changes I make are automatically available on the home machine that evening. It is completely transparent and requires NO attention from me. Ubuntu One makes my home and office machines exact copies of each other. Same files, same directory structure.

The second best part is that even if the internet is unavailable (a common occurence in the middle of rural nowhere) I can still access all of my documents because they are mirrored on my internal hard drive.

As for the 2GB, so far it is more than adequate. I need constant access to text files, spreadsheets and a contact manager, but they all rely on text file and 2GB is plenty of space for text. I have very little need to sync sound, picture, or video files.

ctdahle
December 21st, 2009, 04:35 AM
As I understand it you need to b e using an Ubuntu machine to access the data.

I would have thought that it would be much more useful if the data can be accessed from any machine via a web browser.

Peter, in fact you can. It's not so smooth and transparent if you are stuck at a windows machine, but you can log on to Ubuntu One and get at your files just fine, even in Intenet Explorer, assuming that machine has software that can read files in the format you saved them. (OpenOffice can safe in MS.doc format and those files are readable in Word).

If I knew I would have to frequently access my documents when I was away from "home", and using stranger's computers in a library or cafe, I'd probably configure a flash drive to run a live session of Linux for that purpose, but I have a laptop for that very reason, and with Ubuntu One, I see exactly the same document directories and files on my home desktop, my work desktop, and on my laptop.

ctdahle
December 21st, 2009, 04:43 AM
I was deterred from subscribing by their T&C's:



Maybe I'm just paranoid but whenever I read stuff like that I get worried. It's so MS.... :-k

No one who allows you to store data on their server is going to give you more security than that. If you have data so sensitive that you are worried that your storage provider will disclose it under the terms of a lawful court order, you better not be sending it over the internet at all, not even as an email attachment.

Krovas
December 23rd, 2009, 11:50 AM
Krovas, that's pretty backward thinking for someone progressive enough to be using Linux.

I calls 'em as I sees 'em, and I don't necessarily equate new with good. Cloud computing is giving up too much control, and control over my pc and my files is a major reason I switched to Linux in the first place.

skovy
December 23rd, 2009, 04:00 PM
I calls 'em as I sees 'em, and I don't necessarily equate new with good. Cloud computing is giving up too much control, and control over my pc and my files is a major reason I switched to Linux in the first place.

how is it giving up control? if you encrypt the "too important" info before you load it on to the cloud, then you would be the only one that could access it, unless you gave someone else permision. im guessing that you dont use email cause everything you post on the web is stored somewhere, and the postal service is so reliable and secure that you would trust them with that info that is too important for a cloud?

being more security minded shouldnt limit your use of technology, but should enable you to use it more wisely.