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OMJD
November 4th, 2009, 11:55 PM
Hi guys,

Today I took a Cisco exam. In general, I'm dissatisfied with the dated course material and the way in which the whole system works, including the assessment tests.

Firstly, it's not the most advanced Cisco qualification available. However, you would expect the course to be of reasonable quality, and of course, you'd expect it to be up to date! In my case, it wasn't.

Here's one question which I had to answer in this test:




"What are three important considerations when selecting a Linux distribution? (Choose three.)

- whether the computer will be used as a client or a server
- whether or not the computer will be connected to a network
- whether or not a GUI interface is required
- whether or not a command line user interface is required
- the experience level of the user"

First problem is that they didn't even state what the Linux operating system would be used for in this case... Aside from that, I couldn't believe that I was given a choice of answers which were all (in my opinion) either wrong, irrelevant or subjective.

For example:

"- whether the computer will be used as a client or a server"

This doesn't matter at all, because Linux can be used as either a desktop/client operating system, or a server.

"- whether or not the computer will be connected to a network"

Again, this possible answer isn't right either. Simply because most modern desktop and server operating systems can connect to a network!

"- whether or not a GUI interface is required"

This isn't a major factor to consider, because Linux can use a GUI or CLI, or both!

"- whether or not a command line user interface is required"

See above...

"- the experience level of the user"

Is this REALLY a factor to consider? I don't think so. To use Linux, you don't need to be a computer expert in this day and age.

----

The end result? A question which can't be answered...

It's not acceptable imo. It's quite clear that the test questions and answers were written a long time ago, possibly at a time when the answers given would have been more applicable.

If this represents the quality of Cisco certifications overall, then I'm surprised that they're even valued by employers!

What are your thoughts on this? And has anyone had any similar experiences with regards to Cisco certifications?

Cheers

OMJD

pwnst*r
November 4th, 2009, 11:58 PM
so are you going to copy/paste this to an email to cisco or just rant here?

OMJD
November 5th, 2009, 12:01 AM
so are you going to copy/paste this to an email to cisco or just rant here?

I've already emailed them. I'm posting here to see what people's thoughts are. I'm particularly interested in hearing from those with previous experience with Cisco certifications. The reason is that I'm hesitant as to whether or not I should continue going down the Cisco route once I've completed this course.

Icehuck
November 5th, 2009, 12:12 AM
I'm guessing you failed?

Remember they are not saying linux, but a distribution of linux.

Every distribution of linux is not the same. Arch doesn't make a good server. However, you probably will use SUSE Enterprise or RHEL for your server.

Does the use of CLI make a difference? Yes, your general users won't be using it and simple changes on their desktops should keep them away from it. (Ubuntu's goal ring a bell?)

Need we go on?

juancarlospaco
November 5th, 2009, 12:13 AM
Whats the Course?, Cisco got Linux courses?

Im CCNA, and everyday love more and more the Vyatta Linux Router :)

OMJD
November 5th, 2009, 12:26 AM
I'm guessing you failed?

Remember they are not saying linux, but a distribution of linux.

Every distribution of linux is not the same. Arch doesn't make a good server. However, you probably will use SUSE Enterprise or RHEL for your server.

Does the use of CLI make a difference? Yes, your general users won't be using it and simple changes on their desktops should keep them away from it. (Ubuntu's goal ring a bell?)

Need we go on?

No, I got 89% on that test.

And in my opinion, it's still very subjective. For instance, I'm sure there's many who use Arch linux as a server and rate it for that purpose.

And yes, I agree with your comment regarding CLI. However, this need not be a deciding factor on which Linux distribution you pick, considering that no Linux distribution forces you to use a GUI. Equally, most (if not all) distributions can run a GUI! So this imo should not be a deciding factor on a particular distribution. Take Ubuntu desktop and server edition for example, it's the same distribution, just with different packages installed.

A lot of it imo comes down to preference. And answers to questions like that shouldn't be based on preferences or opinions, but should be entirely factual. I'm sure people can justify some of the questions in one context or another (as you have done) However, even when you do that, you are still left with having to choose the three "most important" factors. This again, is subjective and not factual.

Icehuck
November 5th, 2009, 12:37 AM
No I got 89% on that test.

And in my opinion, it's still very subjective. For instance, I'm sure there's many who use Arch linux as a server and rate it for that purpose.

A lot of it imo comes down to preference. And answers to questions like that shouldn't be based on preferences or opinions, but should be entirely factual. I'm sure people can justify some of the questions in one context or another (as you have done) However, even when you do that, you are still left with having to choose the three "most important" factors. This again, is subjective and not factual.

Remember CCNA/CCNP/CCIE are all done from the corporation perspective. Anything you look at you, have to look at from that of a corporation. You don't make money if your sales guys are messing around in the terminal. Paycheck's don't get issued if finance is trying to use gawk and sed on text files.

What you think about linux is irrelevant because your employer will take the same stance as Cisco.

Edit - If I remember this right, this info was all out of the introduction chapters(chapter 1 or chapter 2). They give a person a quick run down of computers and they do it just fine. The rest of the book will still apply as the commands for Cisco equipment haven't changed.

Mike'sHardLinux
November 5th, 2009, 12:55 AM
To the OP, you never answered the question what test are you talking about?

Is it an actual Cisco cert exam, or some test you took in your Cisco course? I didn't know there was anything about Linux in any Cisco certification.....

Icehuck
November 5th, 2009, 12:58 AM
To the OP, you never answered the question what test are you talking about?

Is it an actual Cisco cert exam, or some test you took in your Cisco course? I didn't know there was anything about Linux in any Cisco certification.....

Honestly, it looks like he in enrolled in the Cisco Net Academy. They give you a bunch of classes and tests in order to help prep you. It sounds like he is just in the intro chapters of those classes where they give you a run down of computers and computer history.

Mike'sHardLinux
November 5th, 2009, 01:03 AM
Icehuck, that's what I suspect, too.

I am not sure how much Cisco can be blamed if some junior college teacher puts some extra [mis]information in their curriculum.....

blueshiftoverwatch
November 5th, 2009, 01:11 AM
"- the experience level of the user"

Is this REALLY a factor to consider? I don't think so. To use Linux, you don't need to be a computer expert in this day and age.
You =/= average computer user

Linux may be making major strides in the field of usability. But like it or not it's still not suitable for the average person. By average person I mean the person who would re-install Windows as soon as he had to use the command line or edit a text file.