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rsiddharth
October 8th, 2009, 02:19 PM
I am looking for a software to cater to my java programming needs . I am learning java and I prefer using an IDE . I have used Netbeans before and now I want to try something new .

My System Config :
OS : Free version of ubuntu 8.04 .
1.24 GB RAM
3.06 GHz Pentium processor .

I Thank you for your Help ! .

MrStill
October 8th, 2009, 04:42 PM
My university uses Java as an introduction to programming; and, most of my class mates use Eclipse.

Druke
October 8th, 2009, 06:08 PM
eclipse or net beans is my preference.

actually... I don't know of any other java ide's TBH :oops:

although if you're just doing beginner level uni stuff, you learn the basics more completly with just gedit and gedit-plugins.

JCoster
October 8th, 2009, 06:16 PM
If you're just starting, I'd recommend BlueJ.
However, I use Eclipse now and never had a problem with it.

MrStill
October 8th, 2009, 07:13 PM
although if you're just doing beginner level uni stuff, you learn the basics more completly with just gedit and gedit-plugins.

Beginners rely too heavily on bracket closing, and error checking. gedit or notepd++ ( for Windows but runs on Wine though) are nice because you get colored keywords and comments but none of the extra utilities that beginners use as a crutch.

NoaHall
October 8th, 2009, 07:19 PM
I don't think that's a fair point. I use automatic bracket closing(thanks to geany) , but I don't rely on it. I might be alot more advance than a beginner, but I still use features like that - it's a time saver, more than anything. I don't think I've ever seen a good error check in coding. It's always easier to debug yourself.

MrStill
October 8th, 2009, 07:27 PM
I only say this because I tutor a good bit of junior year software engineering students who have a good deal of difficulty finding bracket errors.

But, I do agree that for more experienced programmers bracket closing and similar functions do save time and irritation when dealing with more complex code.

NoaHall
October 8th, 2009, 07:32 PM
Ah, I see. I know the feeling - try telling people that elseif's won't run unless the conditions are met, and else's will only run if no other set conditions are met. I'm tired of explaining it.

fiddler616
October 9th, 2009, 02:53 AM
My System Config :
OS : Free version of ubuntu 8.04 .
1.24 GB RAM
3.06 GHz Pentium processor .
Just to clear things up: All versions of Ubuntu are free. If you're offered a non-free version, run away screaming. Actually, investigate it, and see if they offer you anything nifty for the money. And then run away.

IDE-wise...I'd like to recommend gedit (aka "Text Editor"), but compiling/running from the command line, though not hard, is probably not desirable for beginners. Netbeans is good, and I've also heard good things about Eclipse. Also look into Geany--which is a lot simpler (this can be a good thing).

sloggerkhan
October 9th, 2009, 02:56 AM
For java, eclipse.
I like geany, but I mostly use it for web stuff and python.

bluelamp999
October 9th, 2009, 02:58 AM
+1 for Eclipse

rsiddharth
October 10th, 2009, 03:36 PM
Thank you Mr.Still , Druke , fiddler616 and others for your suggestions and perspective . Its most likely now that I will choose between gedit and eclipse . But I have one more question that's been lingering in my mind from the time I started thinking about the change . I have quiet a lot of code written using NetBeans IDE , will gedit or eclipse recognize the Netbeans's way of storing code ? - Project --> package --> code .

nipunreddevil
October 10th, 2009, 03:56 PM
Eclipse is very widely used
Geany is light and i prefer it

rsiddharth
October 10th, 2009, 04:14 PM
Eclipse is very widely used
Geany is light and i prefer it
Thanks for you terse suggestion , I will look into geany .

NoaHall
October 10th, 2009, 04:18 PM
+1 for geany.

rsiddharth
October 11th, 2009, 08:09 AM
+1 for geany.
I have finally chosen to install geany !! .

Thank you all for your help .