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View Full Version : [ubuntu] Is there any support for my MX revolution?



rocky35
August 17th, 2009, 03:12 AM
It really amazes me that companies do not support the linux OS. I cant imagine it can be that hard to support. Worst case scenario you give those with the skill set in the open source community the ability to support the products. Seems like a total lack of vision on the part of these companies. Seems to me they cant see the forest for the trees. I am sure I would be considered to be in the older generation to some degree. I am not a teenage kid but what I do know from my son and his teenage kids that the open source is very attractive to them. It gives them the freedom to do what they want, how they want. I undertand this is the obvious attraction to an OS like linux based systems. My point is Dell is offering a choice to get a linux based machine when you order them. I will be building my machines but none the less its being offered. That tells me there is a large enough market for one of the biggest pc makers to pay attention and offer it. Lets face it if 10 people use something no one pays attention. Saying that why does a company like Logitech basically say use Windows or Mac or go spit. This MX revolution is just an overpriced mouse I can buy for 15 dollars when it does not have support to work as designed. I have been reading and all I see is the market demands blah blah. WHERE IS THE INCENTIVE TO BUY IF YOU DONT SUPPORT? duh even my 16 yr old son understands that. Sorry to vent but anyway, does anyone have any ideas of how to get this to work?

Mark Phelps
August 17th, 2009, 03:40 PM
It really amazes me that companies do not support the linux OS. I cant imagine it can be that hard to support.

I understand your frustration, but in an era when company execs are looking for any way to "cut costs" (meaning, protect their bonuses), spending valuable developer hours to write drivers for an OS that comprises, at most, 5% of their market is not something they're going to do.

Given that the combination of MS Windows boxes and Macs still comprise probably 90% + of the market, I find it amazing that AMD and Nvidia continue to spend the resources to support the Linux community with drivers.

The downside of community-based support is that if you're the only person in the community using something, support is going to be nonexistent.

Nepherte
August 17th, 2009, 07:35 PM
I believe you forgot to mention what exactly didn't work on your MX Revolution. I happen to have one myself, and the mouse pretty much works: the cursor moves, I can scroll in both modes, firefox recognizes my back and forward button and I can assign actions to other buttons.

egalvan
August 17th, 2009, 07:53 PM
I understand your frustration, but in an era when company execs are looking for any way to "cut costs" (meaning, protect their bonuses), spending valuable developer hours to write drivers for an OS that comprises, at most, 5% of their market is not something they're going to do.


Why spend "valuable developer hours"?

Offer two free samples a year, along with the required documentation, to anyone who will write and maintain the code. :)

Call up Mr. Stallman, Mr. Hall, or Mr Torvalds to see if they have anyone they can recommend to do the job.

Many times the *.nix developers complain that it's a lack of hardware samples and documentation that keeps the Open Source drivers from being written.

The Linux community has the smarts and desire to do the job...
it's the closed nature of much of the hardware that keeps it from being done.

rocky35
August 18th, 2009, 02:08 AM
how did you get the buttons to work? I do not know how to program these buttons. I want to use my right and left scroll wheel buttons to flip between cube screens. I would like to use my thumb wheel for some other things I am learning. I guess I was frustrated last night because I do feel like the people in this community can and would write support for devices ect... if given enough information to do so. So man hours do not really apply.

Nepherte
August 18th, 2009, 03:10 PM
Assigning those actions to those buttons you mention might be a little difficult, depending on how easy going compiz is (If that's what you're refering to with those cubes). The buttons are recognized, so that won't be the issue. There's just no action assigned to it.

I don' t use compiz myself but if I recall correctly, you should be able to assign a key to those actions in ccsm (compizconfig-settings-manager). Does compiz accept the keys you want?

rocky35
August 19th, 2009, 01:48 AM
Assigning those actions to those buttons you mention might be a little difficult, depending on how easy going compiz is (If that's what you're refering to with those cubes). The buttons are recognized, so that won't be the issue. There's just no action assigned to it.

I don' t use compiz myself but if I recall correctly, you should be able to assign a key to those actions in ccsm (compizconfig-settings-manager). Does compiz accept the keys you want?


I see where I can assign buttons to the cube what I am saying is I go into mouse settings and nowhere is there a place to set the mouse buttons to a specific keystroke. I am using the default mouse settings in Ubuntu I just have no idea how or where to get set this mouse up because there is no support for linux from logitech.

Nepherte
August 19th, 2009, 04:46 PM
btnx is capable of doing this.

rocky35
August 20th, 2009, 12:08 PM
btnx is capable of doing this.


btnx? is that something in add/remove that I install or is it already installed?

Copernicus1234
August 20th, 2009, 12:13 PM
Why spend "valuable developer hours"?

Offer two free samples a year, along with the required documentation, to anyone who will write and maintain the code. :)

Call up Mr. Stallman, Mr. Hall, or Mr Torvalds to see if they have anyone they can recommend to do the job.

Many times the *.nix developers complain that it's a lack of hardware samples and documentation that keeps the Open Source drivers from being written.

The Linux community has the smarts and desire to do the job...
it's the closed nature of much of the hardware that keeps it from being done.

Very true. We would have so much better hardware support if companies would at least share technical documentation on how to communicate with the hardware so the Linux community can build a good driver.

Its hardly "effort" to share such documentation. They just dont have any incentive I guess. But its strange, because those extra 1-2% of people buying their hardware for their Linux machines should generate enough revenue to cover that effort.

For example, when I buy a printer, I need it to support Linux. Its pretty obvious that some printers wont get sold simply because there are no Linux drivers.