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dr_voodoo
August 3rd, 2009, 06:36 PM
Hi guys!

Linux n00b here so please be gentle!

I finally decided to give Linux a go since I've been hearing a lot of good stuff about it. After messing around with a couple of distros I eventually decided to go with (k)ubuntu, however, I'm having a few issues which I don't think I should be. My spec is:

Dell Dimension 4600 series Desktop, 1.5gb ram
1x 80gb HD (Kubuntu is installed on this)
1x Hitachi 320gb HD, split into 2 NTFS partitions, one containing XP install, the other is for data.
1x Maxtor 320gb external USB HD.

When I was installing Linux via the Live CD, both the 80gb and 320 gb hard drives were visible from the installation wizard. I installed Linux to the 80gb drive with no hitches.

However, when I boot into ubuntu, neither partition of the NTFS drive is visible. I have the NTFS-3g driver present and correct. Eventually I want to be running in a dual-boot scenario as I have audio apps that I require XP to run. On booting, I go into the GRUB boot manager and it doesn't detect the XP drive either.

On top of all of this, it doesn't detect the USB drive either!

All my drives were performing correctly before I installed Linux! halp pliz!
:confused:

SuperSonic4
August 3rd, 2009, 06:38 PM
For the usb drive - have you tried mounting it in dolphin by clicking on it?

Also can you post the following outputs from the terminal (KMenu -> Search for konsole and click to open)


sudo fdisk -l (shows disks mounted or otherwise)

cat /boot/grub/menu.lst (shows boot menu)

cat /etc/fstab (shows automounts on startup)

dr_voodoo
August 3rd, 2009, 06:59 PM
Let's leave the USB disk out of the equation for the moment as it's less important anyway.

'sudo fdisk -l' [scary typing fdisk if you don't want to format the damn thing!] gives me

Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80000000000 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9726 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xea28da73

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 9324 74894998+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 9325 9726 3229065 5 Extended
/dev/sda5 9325 9726 3229033+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Disk /dev/sdb: 320.0 GB, 320072933376 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xdd1905f2

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdb1 1 38913 312568641 8e Linux LVM



'etc\fstab' gives me

# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# -- This file has been automaticly generated by ntfs-config --
#
# <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>

proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
# Entry for /dev/sda1 :
UUID=d41b1bf4-8616-4636-a3da-8262f40055ec / ext3 relatime,errors=remount-ro 0 1
# Entry for /dev/sda5 :
UUID=ca6fb2d1-c007-49af-99a0-591ba84ec876 none swap sw 0 0
/dev/scd0 /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto,exec,utf8 0 0


and 'meu'lst' gives me


# menu.lst - See: grub(8), info grub, update-grub(8)
# grub-install(8), grub-floppy(8),
# grub-md5-crypt, /usr/share/doc/grub
# and /usr/share/doc/grub-doc/.

## default num
# Set the default entry to the entry number NUM. Numbering starts from 0, and
# the entry number 0 is the default if the command is not used.
#
# You can specify 'saved' instead of a number. In this case, the default entry
# is the entry saved with the command 'savedefault'.
# WARNING: If you are using dmraid do not use 'savedefault' or your
# array will desync and will not let you boot your system.
default 0

## timeout sec
# Set a timeout, in SEC seconds, before automatically booting the default entry
# (normally the first entry defined).
timeout 3

## hiddenmenu
# Hides the menu by default (press ESC to see the menu)
hiddenmenu

# Pretty colours
#color cyan/blue white/blue

## password ['--md5'] passwd
# If used in the first section of a menu file, disable all interactive editing
# control (menu entry editor and command-line) and entries protected by the
# command 'lock'
# e.g. password topsecret
# password --md5 $1$gLhU0/$aW78kHK1QfV3P2b2znUoe/
# password topsecret

#
# examples
#
# title Windows 95/98/NT/2000
# root (hd0,0)
# makeactive
# chainloader +1
#
# title Linux
# root (hd0,1)
# kernel /vmlinuz root=/dev/hda2 ro
#

#
# Put static boot stanzas before and/or after AUTOMAGIC KERNEL LIST

### BEGIN AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST
## lines between the AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST markers will be modified
## by the debian update-grub script except for the default options below

## DO NOT UNCOMMENT THEM, Just edit them to your needs

## ## Start Default Options ##
## default kernel options
## default kernel options for automagic boot options
## If you want special options for specific kernels use kopt_x_y_z
## where x.y.z is kernel version. Minor versions can be omitted.
## e.g. kopt=root=/dev/hda1 ro
## kopt_2_6_8=root=/dev/hdc1 ro
## kopt_2_6_8_2_686=root=/dev/hdc2 ro
# kopt=root=UUID=d41b1bf4-8616-4636-a3da-8262f40055ec ro

## default grub root device
## e.g. groot=(hd0,0)
# groot=d41b1bf4-8616-4636-a3da-8262f40055ec

## should update-grub create alternative automagic boot options
## e.g. alternative=true
## alternative=false
# alternative=true

## should update-grub lock alternative automagic boot options
## e.g. lockalternative=true
## lockalternative=false
# lockalternative=false

## additional options to use with the default boot option, but not with the
## alternatives
## e.g. defoptions=vga=791 resume=/dev/hda5
# defoptions=quiet splash

## should update-grub lock old automagic boot options
## e.g. lockold=false
## lockold=true
# lockold=false

## Xen hypervisor options to use with the default Xen boot option
# xenhopt=

## Xen Linux kernel options to use with the default Xen boot option
# xenkopt=console=tty0

## altoption boot targets option
## multiple altoptions lines are allowed
## e.g. altoptions=(extra menu suffix) extra boot options
## altoptions=(recovery) single
# altoptions=(recovery mode) single

## controls how many kernels should be put into the menu.lst
## only counts the first occurence of a kernel, not the
## alternative kernel options
## e.g. howmany=all
## howmany=7
# howmany=all

## specify if running in Xen domU or have grub detect automatically
## update-grub will ignore non-xen kernels when running in domU and vice versa
## e.g. indomU=detect
## indomU=true
## indomU=false
# indomU=detect

## should update-grub create memtest86 boot option
## e.g. memtest86=true
## memtest86=false
# memtest86=true

## should update-grub adjust the value of the default booted system
## can be true or false
# updatedefaultentry=false

## should update-grub add savedefault to the default options
## can be true or false
# savedefault=false

## ## End Default Options ##

title Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-11-generic
uuid d41b1bf4-8616-4636-a3da-8262f40055ec
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.28-11-generic root=UUID=d41b1bf4-8616-4636-a3da-8262f40055ec ro quiet splash
initrd /boot/initrd.img-2.6.28-11-generic
quiet

title Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-11-generic (recovery mode)
uuid d41b1bf4-8616-4636-a3da-8262f40055ec
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.28-11-generic root=UUID=d41b1bf4-8616-4636-a3da-8262f40055ec ro single
initrd /boot/initrd.img-2.6.28-11-generic

title Ubuntu 9.04, memtest86+
uuid d41b1bf4-8616-4636-a3da-8262f40055ec
kernel /boot/memtest86+.bin
quiet

### END DEBIAN AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST

ajgreeny
August 3rd, 2009, 07:27 PM
I hate to say this to you, but it appears that your windows installation is no longer there on sdb, which has only one partition, which is an LVM partition not NTFS.

Depending on what you did to this 320GB disk, it may be possible to get back the partition table and salvage your windows install, but whatever you do, don't try to write anything to that disk and if possible avoid anything that could cause you more problems. Using your ubuntu install, which I assume you are using, not the live CD, download testdisk from http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk, and see if you can use that to recover your windows. I have never used it personally, but know that it can do the job you require of it, so do some reading and I hope it puts you back where you want to be.

conradin
August 3rd, 2009, 07:43 PM
recants statement

dr_voodoo
August 3rd, 2009, 07:44 PM
oh dear lord!

how the hell did that happen - I've been EXTREMELY careful when installing from the liveCDs

aargh
:x
I'm bricking it now!

dr_voodoo
August 3rd, 2009, 08:41 PM
ajgreeny you were right - it would appear I have nuked my old file table somehow!

this is terrible... I have run testdisk but so far no joy picking up the old FAT - only the new lunux one... aaargh.... this is terrible :o:o:o

ajgreeny
August 3rd, 2009, 09:17 PM
I hope you have backups of your data which will at least mean you can reinstall windows again and restore all your files, but if not you will at least have learned a very expensive lesson. However, there may be other people who can tell you more about testdisk than I can, to enable recovery of your old partition table.

dr_voodoo
August 3rd, 2009, 10:28 PM
some of it, yeah... but not all of it.

I'm going to try a different utility and see if I can rescue individual files instead.

honestly though, who the hell makes an OS install CD that formats ALL drives as a default option (there's no way in hell I actually ASKED it to do that!)..?

ajgreeny
August 4th, 2009, 09:20 PM
honestly though, who the hell makes an OS install CD that formats ALL drives as a default option (there's no way in hell I actually ASKED it to do that!)..?Microsoft?

In fact if you had chosen to use just one disk for your Ubuntu install, there is no way the other one would have been touched, and certainly it would not have been turned into an LVM partition, so I find it very peculiar that you find yourself in this unfortunate situation. I think you must have somehow clicked an option box or done something which you obviously now can't remember, in order to end up where you are.

I honestly don't believe it is the fault of the Ubuntu installer, and would also add that I would never do anything to any of my partitions without backing everything up first. Normally nothing goes wrong, but you can bet your boots that the time you have no backups is the time it all goes up the Swannee.

Best of luck getting everything back again!! If you ever sort out what happened, post back and tell us, so we can make sure we never get into the same difficult situation.