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netbook
June 2nd, 2009, 06:51 AM
couple of questions, i want to install some updates in the update manager but when i do it tells me i need more space in my fliesystem, can i just delete what is there or is it important?

2nd what are some fun things i may want to try on linux now that i have it installed, screenlets, effefcts, etc. and how can i do so

thanks

netbook

pspsampsp
June 2nd, 2009, 06:58 AM
its safe to delete stuff in your home folder however i wouldnt delete anything from anywhere else , are you running from a flash drive? if so i would buy a larger flashdrive.

netbook
June 8th, 2009, 07:13 AM
no i have installed linux on my hard drive, but when i try to install it says not enough space, linux has 80 gigs so that should be plenty

the file system is the are with too little space i think

cariboo
June 8th, 2009, 07:48 AM
Depending on how much you have installed, the archived packages in /var/cache/apt/archives may be taking up a fair amount of hard drive space. TO clean out the archived packages, open and Applications-->Accessories-->Terminal and type:


sudo apt-get clean

and to remove unneeded dependencies in the same terminal type:


sudo apt-get autoclean

So far, there are no gui tools to reclaim hard drive space used by archived packages.

CJ Master
June 8th, 2009, 08:51 AM
So far, there are no gui tools to reclaim hard drive space used by archived packages.

Sorry, but isn't there a GUI tool called "cruft remover" that does this? Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Elfy
June 8th, 2009, 08:59 AM
no i have installed linux on my hard drive, but when i try to install it says not enough space, linux has 80 gigs so that should be plenty

the file system is the are with too little space i think

Can you open aterminal - run this command and post the results, it will give us a better understanding of how much room you had and now have.


df -h

If space is that tight that you need to clean out the apt cache to use the system then I would suggest that something needs to be done.

netbook
June 10th, 2009, 07:14 AM
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda6 2.3G 2.2G 0 100% /
tmpfs 497M 0 497M 0% /lib/init/rw
varrun 497M 104K 497M 1% /var/run
varlock 497M 0 497M 0% /var/lock
udev 497M 156K 497M 1% /dev
tmpfs 497M 84K 497M 1% /dev/shm
lrm 497M 2.4M 495M 1% /lib/modules/2.6.28-11-generic/volatile
overflow 1.0M 16K 1008K 2% /tmp
/dev/sda2 74G 12G 62G 17% /media/ACER
/dev/sda5 67G 52M 63G 1% /media/for linux

that is what came up after the command suggested.
new problems, my background seems to auto reset randomly

also sometimes i am automatically prompted for a keyring password and other times i have to click the connection applet and put in my wep key the the keyring after selecting my network, why automatic sometimes and others no.

also when i modify my theme and save it doesnt save anywhere.

dont want windows but finding it hard to live with linux too.

please help

netbook
June 11th, 2009, 01:12 AM
ok guys total linux melt down, loaded up today, last night at close everyhting seemed fine other than the aforementioned problems, now i load up, my bottom panel is gone the top one is blank except for some stupid applet window chooser ap, no system, applications, places options, my background and theme are gone and back to default what is happeneing please help.

netbook
June 11th, 2009, 01:41 AM
come on anyone some help here

shae
June 11th, 2009, 01:45 AM
For whatever reason, you installed Ubuntu with a very small root partition that is full. You may need to uninstall some packages to create room there, or expand that partition somehow. I personally now suggest people to use just a / and swap partition rather than separate partitions to help prevent this kind of problem.

netbook
June 11th, 2009, 04:48 AM
ok so what about the rest of my problems???

Elfy
June 11th, 2009, 08:04 AM
I've seen similar issues with other full root partitions. You need to deal with that first - have you run the commands cariboo907 gave earlier - that will create some free space, assuming there are cached packages to remove, and allow you to boot normally.