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calvinlyp
May 28th, 2009, 08:52 AM
hi all,

i am relatively new to linux platform.

i am currently using ubuntu 8.10 and also xubuntu 8.10.

i was trying to install some software to my both platform.

from the README.txt of the software provided:

Operating System Compatibility(2):
Linux 2.2-2.4 glibc2 based
Sun Solaris
Windows NT with Cygnus tools (Cygnus is now accesso! (http://www.cygnus.com))
Other versions of UNIX using the GCC compiler (untested)

so what is Linux2.2-2.4?
how to differentiate all the different version?
how do i know the current platform i am using is compatible to the above stated OS?

thanks alot.

theozzlives
May 28th, 2009, 08:57 AM
That's your kernel version you can check during boot if you hit esc. The top one in the menu is probably the one your using.

glotz
May 28th, 2009, 09:34 AM
You're on a modern 2.6 kernel.
uname -r

netJackDaw
May 28th, 2009, 09:50 AM
What software are you trying to install? If you are looking in the right place you might find a newer version or a modern alternative... But I (we) have to know to be able to direct you...

jerrrys
May 28th, 2009, 10:14 AM
download 'Ubuntu Tweak', it will give you all the specs plus much more. great app for starting out...

http://www.getdeb.net/app/Ubuntu+Tweak

calvinlyp
May 28th, 2009, 10:51 AM
What software are you trying to install? If you are looking in the right place you might find a newer version or a modern alternative... But I (we) have to know to be able to direct you...

i was trying to install a software called sharc from http://sourceforge.net/projects/sharc

after the command:

./configure
make

it generate an error:
cd . && autoconf
/bin/bash: autoconf: command not found
make: *** [configure] Error 127


i have attached 3 files.
all i added the extension of zip.

pls help.

netJackDaw
May 28th, 2009, 05:12 PM
First of all you shold try to install the missing applications/commands that are specified. Try:

sudo apt-get install autoconf

...to install autoconf

If you after that get more errors try to resolve them in the same manner as above. You can search for packages by using:

apt-cache search package_name_or_description

You might also need to install:

sudo apt-get install build-essential

...but still I strongly recommend that you try to find software through supported channels. In that way you get a more stable system with all dependancies resolved.

If you dont like using the command line to search for packages try searching the online package repo at http://packages.ubuntu.com/

Try searching for GPS there and see if you find anything useful.. Maybe the package gpsbabel is something for you. Haven't tried it myself though...

calvinlyp
May 29th, 2009, 09:22 AM
Hi netJackDaw,

actually i did:

apt-get install build-essential

but it stil cant work.

next i tried:
sudo apt-get install autoconf

i got an error of :
E: dpkg was interrupted, you must manually run 'dpkg --configure -a' to correct the problem.

how do i go about to solve this?

thanks

netJackDaw
May 29th, 2009, 11:59 AM
Did you run the suggested dpkg command? I am sorry but I dont think I can help you any further. If you still have problems try to contact the developer and/or the developers forums.