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Bearded-flower
April 26th, 2009, 10:09 AM
I dont know but for some reason ubuntu just isnt doing it for me.
yes, ubuntu is nice and user friendly ( why should i bother with user friendly i do most stuff via command line anyway) but i just want to know what are some other good linux distros out there?
if you have any knowledge of other distros could you just tell me the pros and cons of each one?

Sub101
April 26th, 2009, 10:14 AM
If your competent enough then I would say give Arch a try. It is not user friendly at all but does give you far greater control over everything.

andyhumphries
April 26th, 2009, 10:18 AM
Are there restrictions on control in Ubuntu? For example is it possible to recompile your own Linux kernel or do you have to stick with the pre-compiled patches coming through apt-get?

Ahadiel
April 26th, 2009, 10:18 AM
+1 for Arch.

Also have a look here (http://distrowatch.com).

Sub101
April 26th, 2009, 10:27 AM
Are there restrictions on control in Ubuntu? For example is it possible to recompile your own Linux kernel or do you have to stick with the pre-compiled patches coming through apt-get?

No im pretty sure you can compile your own kernels. Never done it myself though....

jespdj
April 26th, 2009, 10:31 AM
I dont know but for some reason ubuntu just isnt doing it for me.
You don't say what "it" is, so it is impossible to give you advice on a distro that does "it" for you.

DistroWatch.com (http://distrowatch.com/) has an overview of many Linux distributions.

Are there restrictions on control in Ubuntu? For example is it possible to recompile your own Linux kernel or do you have to stick with the pre-compiled patches coming through apt-get?
Ubuntu is free software, which means you have the freedom to do with it whatever you want. So ofcourse there are no such restrictions in Ubuntu.

Bearded-flower
April 26th, 2009, 10:45 AM
Im thinking of fedora, or maybe debian
the reason for debian is the package manager (apt-get) system

StuartN
April 26th, 2009, 10:53 AM
Im thinking of fedora, or maybe debian
the reason for debian is the package manager (apt-get) system

Debian Lenny sounds like a sound side-grade - all the same features that form the basis of Ubuntu, but a far more methodical approach to upgrading that emphasises stability and backward compatibility.

DeMus
April 26th, 2009, 10:53 AM
Im thinking of fedora, or maybe debian
the reason for debian is the package manager (apt-get) system

Like apt-get in Ubuntu. So what is the difference?
What exactly is it you don't like in Ubuntu, can you be more specific?

Bearded-flower
April 26th, 2009, 11:04 AM
I honestly dont know its just, yeah i dont know something i probably sound really stupid but i dont know theres just something i dont like about it

jordan420
April 26th, 2009, 11:09 AM
man i got tired of ubuntu too and went to mandriva. but still dual boot with kubuntu though thats the beauty of it, you can have multiple boots... but anyway, Mandriva imho has a little bit more support for KDE. which i like. has its own problems though like just about any distro.

mingtien
April 26th, 2009, 11:18 AM
A suggestion:

find an old machine that you might have lying around -- I mean properly old, like a 486 with 16 MB RAM...

... go to oldlinux.org, and grab some old release; one of my favourites is the 'MCC Interim Release' -- I remember downloading it on a Sun IPX, and writing it to floppies, so excited to get home and install each new release!
Pick whichever version you like (old Slackware is quite nice too) and work with only that version for a few days...

(at least for me) the user-friendliness and completeness of Ubuntu looks very appealing after that :)

Bearded-flower
April 26th, 2009, 11:20 AM
Yeah but i dont have any old computers lying around, my last laptop is i belive in about 27 peices and the only remaining part left is the harddrive

mingtien
April 26th, 2009, 03:38 PM
You might settle for one of the new minimalist Linux distributions running in VirtualBox then :)

I keep promising myself that I'll spend a few days with Slitaz -- (actually the live CD works very nicely). There is something very appealing about a truly functional system that runs very nicely on old iron (trans. that is not bloated).

I also keep promising myself to configure 'the ultimate USB Linux stick' -- a cheap generic USB stick from 7-11, with a nicely working Linux configuration that will work on any old iron, and has everything that I would need to have with me for a month (office, constantly used documents and calculations, personal things that I might miss, travel guides). The idea is you can go anywhere and have a completely working system that can be used in an Internet cafe (I do disappear up to Laos from time to time).

Bearded-flower
April 28th, 2009, 08:44 AM
Why would i wanna run it in a Vbox???
and after some research and input from a friend i have decided on Pclinux os (http://pclinuxos.com/)

jordan420
May 1st, 2009, 06:26 AM
pclinuxos is nice i used that for awhile. it is Mandriva based. in my opinion i would just go for full blown mandriva. it really is a nice operating system. PCLoS is a little to windowsified for me. and in case you dont like the synaptic part in ubuntu, PCLOS comes with a synaptic rontend to RPM so your stuck with at least that part about ubuntu. ;-)

djdarrin91
May 1st, 2009, 06:35 AM
Have you tried Kubuntu? I know it's pretty close to Ubuntu but just thought i would ask. Good luck:)

Kareeser
May 1st, 2009, 06:40 AM
I'm gonna wager that the newness wore off, and Ubuntu's just too gosh darn stable for him ;)

Nexusx6
May 1st, 2009, 06:46 AM
If you've been using Ubuntu for a while and you feel like you're ready for advanced stuff, I also have to give a +1 for Arch Linux. Its not Slackware, but its defiantly more advanced than Ubuntu and its well known as the "intermediate" level distro.

XubuRoxMySox
May 1st, 2009, 12:56 PM
Ubuntu is fully customizable, so you can have as much or as little as you like! You want it to be more "Linuxy?" Then try the Ubuntu-based distro called Crunchbang (http://crunchbanglinux.org). I've been playing with it about a week and really like it! It's a very minimal Ubuntu installation with apps selected for their speed. "Ubuntu without the bloat," some folks say. I used Crunchbang to resurrect an old computer that my family had given up for dead, and it runs much faster on Crunchbang than my new machine runs on Ubuntu 8.10. I ordered my Jaunty disk two weeks ago now and still haven't got it, but I'm looking forward to experimenting with it.

markp1989
May 1st, 2009, 01:14 PM
i would also vote for arch, just make sure you read there VERY good wiki

http://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Beginners_Guide


http://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Official_Arch_Linux_Install_Guide

these are the 2 wikis that i used most when setting up my arch system

Eisenwinter
May 1st, 2009, 01:22 PM
+1 for Arch.

Also have a look here (http://distrowatch.com).
Another big +1 for Arch.

If you feel you have enough experience, then by all means, go for Arch.

You will NOT be bored, I guarantee you that :P

SuperSonic4
May 1st, 2009, 01:26 PM
Mandriva is pretty sweet - especially the MCC and KDE support.

However it's another +1 for arch. Two other guides to help you will be

http://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Wicd <-- for setting up your network

http://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Pacman <-- nifty tricks with pacman (package manager)

edit: I've uploaded the wicd (64 bit) package for easy install offline in case you can't get the internet working right away. To install it (as root)


pacman -U /path/to/package/package_name-version.pkg.tar.gz

(taken from arch wiki's pacman page)

Wiebelhaus
May 1st, 2009, 01:36 PM
Compile your own (http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/)

jordey24
May 1st, 2009, 01:38 PM
Im thinking of fedora, or maybe debian
the reason for debian is the package manager (apt-get) system

isn't Ubuntu based on Debian?

Therion
May 1st, 2009, 01:45 PM
isn't Ubuntu based on Debian?
Yes. Any Ubuntu user would feel comfortable moving about in Debian. It just just lacks some of Ubuntu's bells and whistles.

Oh, and the Friendly Community support.

And before some Debian user gets all ticked off about that statement, that's my own personal experience speaking from having actually tried Debian (Lenny) AND Sidux, over a period of a few months. IMO, the Debian community could learn a lot from the Ubuntu community.

coutts99
May 1st, 2009, 02:17 PM
Gentoo

tarps87
May 1st, 2009, 02:41 PM
Another Arch +1

The install the Kdemod version of Kde
http://kdemod.ath.cx/

Bölvağur
May 1st, 2009, 02:46 PM
linux from scratch

pros: you have to do everything your self
cons: you have to do everything your self

gnomeuser
May 1st, 2009, 02:49 PM
If you want more commandline and configuration, with what comes of learning new things you could look at Gentoo (or Exherbo).

Aside that I quite like Foresight.

John.Michael.Kane
May 1st, 2009, 02:52 PM
You could try slackware (http://www.slackware.com/).

entr3p
May 1st, 2009, 03:02 PM
No doubt the best OS in my opinion is FreeBSD. Try it out. Most likely you'll love it if it supports your hardware.

guitar_man
May 1st, 2009, 03:07 PM
try fedora..its the first disro I've tried...Fedora Core 5 is my first taste of linux

automaton26
May 1st, 2009, 03:18 PM
I'd personally suggest Kubuntu (!) but I know others who like Slackware, Fedora, Mandriva.

mamamia88
May 1st, 2009, 03:30 PM
No doubt the best OS in my opinion is FreeBSD. Try it out. Most likely you'll love it if it supports your hardware.

hey man is the livefs iso a live cd?

stwschool
May 1st, 2009, 05:50 PM
Just been mucking about with slitaz seeing as it's been mentioned here, damn it's good. It's amazing that it can be so usable and use so little memory! It kept going even with 16mb of ram (albeit slow) and was perfectly runnable at 32mb. Consider me impressed!