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View Full Version : World's first Linux Store. That would be something!



Derek Djons
January 5th, 2006, 11:51 PM
I was thinking. Linux is here to stay and the distributions and communities are growing worldwide. I'm seeing some possibilities in it.

For years we are having all kinds of stores. We have normal shops selling computers, we have specialized shops selling computers and hardware and we have Apple Stores / Centre's selling Apple Hardware. But where is the first Linux store?!

Now don't get me wrong. I know that the most distributions are for free. That's why I see potential in a store which gives you some other great possibilities without making money out of distribution sells. But already now (brainstorming five minutes about it) I came up with a couple of services to fund such a shop.

1. Genuis bar (better good stolen than bad invented).
Right now there isn't some kind of service which you could apply to when you have problems. I know most Linux can sort their own problems out (using the internet or other means necessary) but if Linux is going major, walk-in support is very handy. Can't install a driver? Having problems setting up an application or having hardware problems. You name it.

2. Build To Order Computers / Notebooks.
Especially when you are planning to install Linux on a computer hardware can become an issue. Not all the hardware is being that easily support like for example in Mac OS X or Windows. But also developers and power users can customize a machine that they need and which will work 100% with a distribution and it's upfollowing releases.

3. Club.
To help and convince others such shops can begin classes and seminars. Teaching newbies the basics and go indepth with more novice Linux users.

I know all these things can be dealt finding out stuff, reading through piles of supported hardware documents and ordering hardware from two states further but I think combining all this witin one formula Linux clearly leaves a stamp upon the market of Operating Systems and (Desktop) Computers. Just a thought.

stuporglue
January 6th, 2006, 01:31 AM
The first one exists, probably others do too.

http://sub500.com
http://www.michaelrobertson.com/archive.php?minute_id=122

I love Linux and Open Source, but I think Linux computers is still generally a hard sell. Most companies (Apple, Dell etc.) don't sell computers anymore, they sell an experience. For Apple it's (mostly) the home multimedia experience, for Dell it's ease of use. Just check out the pictures on their websites.

I think to sell Linux computers successfully, you'd need to sell an experience as well. Competing directly against Apple or Dell would be rather rough, so it'd have to be a different experience they're not targeting. Maybe security, reliability, customizability, or something else entirely.

I'll be quite excited when a Linux company starts to be competitive with the other big players. :-)

kairu0
January 6th, 2006, 01:34 AM
I think to sell Linux computers successfully, you'd need to sell an experience as well. Competing directly against Apple or Dell would be rather rough, so it'd have to be a different experience they're not targeting. Maybe security, reliability, customizability, or something else entirely.

Just please don't let it be the Walmart-$199-Family-Computer experience ;)

So long as Linspire and others try to enter the market as the "Value" experience, people will think that Linux is a second-rate alternative.

I'd sell the Security experience. The people that look at the experience rather than the specs already have all the Customizability that they want.

prizrak
January 6th, 2006, 02:27 AM
I kinda think that Linux is more of an organizational OS than home user, it should be pushed in big organizations as much as possible. If we get those the home users will follow since they would already be familiar with it at work/school and might actually need to run it at home for connectivity.
It's alot easier to target organizations than it is to target home users so that's what we should concentrate on :)

kairu0
January 6th, 2006, 03:16 AM
You're definitely on to something. As a case study, just look at Microsoft Office. 10 years ago, who would have though that it would be as common as it is today? And, all they had to do was implement a double-aggressive marketing strategy: make it a virtual monopoly in the universities and at the same time sell it to big corporations. Oh yeah, and there was the usual Microsoft bullying, too :-P

Derek Djons
January 6th, 2006, 07:23 PM
I kinda think that Linux is more of an organizational OS than home user, it should be pushed in big organizations as much as possible. If we get those the home users will follow since they would already be familiar with it at work/school and might actually need to run it at home for connectivity.
It's alot easier to target organizations than it is to target home users so that's what we should concentrate on :)

You score some points! The Home User market is filled with all kinds of experienced retailers and online shops which Linux in general wouldn't make a chance (at the moment I must add).

Targeting schools / universities would be a nice start. In my opinion it's the next generation which will be more open for Linux.

Derek Djons
January 6th, 2006, 07:26 PM
I think to sell Linux computers successfully, you'd need to sell an experience as well. Competing directly against Apple or Dell would be rather rough, so it'd have to be a different experience they're not targeting. Maybe security, reliability, customizability, or something else entirely.

I'll be quite excited when a Linux company starts to be competitive with the other big players.

That's indeed true. Just marketing about how good a company at an internal level is and towards it's customers just won't do. These first shops have to let people know in a clear way what's Linux about and what it can mean for them.

Derek Djons
January 6th, 2006, 07:26 PM
I think to sell Linux computers successfully, you'd need to sell an experience as well. Competing directly against Apple or Dell would be rather rough, so it'd have to be a different experience they're not targeting. Maybe security, reliability, customizability, or something else entirely.

I'll be quite excited when a Linux company starts to be competitive with the other big players.

That's indeed true. Just marketing about how good a company at an internal level is and towards it's customers just won't do. These first shops have to let people know in a clear way what's Linux about and what it can mean for them.

fuscia
January 6th, 2006, 08:11 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v342/unknownentity/linuxware.png