PDA

View Full Version : Why not give @ubuntu email mask to everyone?



wolterh
March 16th, 2009, 04:43 AM
Well, the title kind of tells everything that this post is about.

I think that the @ubuntu email address mask (or alias) should be given to everyone, and I know you have your points against this, so I want to hear them.

theozzlives
March 16th, 2009, 04:46 AM
That's for Ubuntu members... along with business cards, etc.

ju2wheels
March 16th, 2009, 04:47 AM
Well quite simply Ubuntu is not an email service provider so why should we be given email addresses on the ubuntu.com domain? Or am I misunderstanding your question.

sgosnell
March 16th, 2009, 04:47 AM
Well, first off it would require running a mail server. That takes time and money.

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 05:00 AM
I agree with woli all the way and in order for me to be an Ubuntu member you have to get lucky and chosen. It isn't based on the skill level with Ubuntu that matters. That's why I switched to debian sid / experimental because Ubuntu had trouble dealing with all the changes to my system I made. Either make everybody an ubuntu member when they are an expert with Ubuntu and when they ask, give them an email address and label them as an Ubuntu member.. Why do you have to be picked? It's not a job, to be a member. It's not like working for a corporate company. It's Ubuntu which is a free and open source distro which is avaliable to everybody so why not expand the Ubuntu member list to all Ubuntu end users who know what they are doing? Separate the Ubuntu masters from beginners without being picked. And if they are just going to pick, at least pick the obviously more experienced users like me. I have 2 years of experience with Ubuntu and C developing and I make bug fixes for Mesa and libdrm so that should clarify me as being an Ubuntu member. I don't ask 2 questions then leave the forum and never come back again. I stay and I make huge commitments. I'm not trying to brag and say "Oh I'm the best Ubuntu user there is" but I am saying that I should be an Ubuntu member based on my level of skill with Ubuntu and linux in general along with programming skills. There is more than that though. My friend, The_OMFG (Dark_x_cel) is a highly experienced PSP and PS3 developer who worked closely with me and DarK_Alex with many projects. The_OMFG is a highly experienced linux user but only has 3 posts. Post count and forum experience should not count. Only experience with the operating system (Ubuntu) and general linux platforms. I'm a co-founder and co-leader of a highly advanced Playstation 3 development team (PS3Brewery) and a very well-known PSP developing team called Team M33. Team M33 was the team that officially hacked the PSP with custom firmware. There should be more than just hanging out in #ubuntuforums-beginners to be an Ubuntu member. Commitment and skill should be the key. Not luck. I believe I have said enough. Also, can a forum mod or staff member move this to where it should be?

Woli, I hear you and I am with you.

mb_webguy
March 16th, 2009, 05:16 AM
Um... there's a big difference between an Ubuntu user and an Ubuntu member. Are you writing code or creating artwork for the next release of Ubuntu? Are you dredging through the new help pages to translate them to Afrikaans or Urdu? If you're not doing this sort of thing or otherwise making a "significant and visible" contribution to Ubuntu, then you're a user, but not a member.

That said, membership is open to anyone who wants to apply (http://www.ubuntu.com/community/processes/newmember), assuming they want to start making these kind of significant contributions to Ubuntu. Membership is earned. It is a mark of honor, and a means of recognizing those who contribute to the wonderful operating system that you're using. And you're right. Being an Ubuntu member isn't like working for a corporation. Ubuntu members aren't paid. For some, the only recompense they have for all of the wonderful work they do is the satisfaction of a job well done, and the recognition they get as a member.

I'm not a member, by the way, and I'm perfectly fine with it. I benefit from the work done by those who are members, which I'm either too busy or otherwise disinclined to do. So do you. You're getting something for nothing. And they're doing something for nothing -- nothing except the small prestige of membership. Why would you want to take this away from these wonderful, hardworking people to whom we who use Ubuntu owe so much?

wolterh
March 16th, 2009, 05:20 AM
Well, for those that don't know already, ubuntu provides to it's members the service of forwarding emails sent to @ubuntu addresses to the email of your choice. Currently, this feature is only for members, and it is not easy to be chosen as a member. Now, I am not saying that it should be easy, but instead, I think that all of us who use ubuntu as a primary OS are the building blocks of ubuntu, and ubuntu is what it is today because of us. If there was no 'us', ubuntu would be just another linux distro.

So, I propose that the @ubuntu email address should be a service for which one applies, and without hesitation, one recieves.

I believe that we, who make ubuntu grow everyday, have the right and deserve the pleasure and delight of having an ubuntu email address.

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 05:23 AM
Well, for those that don't know already, ubuntu provides to it's members the service of forwarding emails sent to @ubuntu addresses to the email of your choice. Currently, this feature is only for members, and it is not easy to be chosen as a member. Now, I am not saying that it should be easy, but instead, I think that all of us who use ubuntu as a primary OS are the building blocks of ubuntu, and ubuntu is what it is today because of us. If there was no 'us', ubuntu would be just another linux distro.

So, I propose that the @ubuntu email address should be a service for which one applies, and without hesitation, one recieves.

I believe that we, who make ubuntu grow everyday, have the right and deserve the pleasure and delight of having an ubuntu email address.

And yet I agree again.

mb_webguy
March 16th, 2009, 05:29 AM
If it's that important to you, then you can register a domain yourself, such as "ubuntu-member.org" (which is apparently available, btw), and provide the service yourself.

As I said in my previous post, membership is a mark of honor, and members get very few perks. Actually, if you don't count the responsibility to participate in the Community Council, the only perks they actually get are the email mask and the right to carry official Ubuntu business cards (which they have to print themselves, btw). So by giving all Ubuntu users an Ubuntu email address, you're taking away half of the benefits of membership!

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 05:34 AM
Well at least make it easier for people to join and automatically just pick people who are good enough with Ubuntu to be an Ubuntu member. I can't leave my xchat window open in ubuntuforums-beginners when I'm busy because then I get distracted and I can't develop for dri.freedesktop.org!! I have to do lots of software programming for my high school diploma (even though I basically have a bachelor's degree already so far) so I can't just chat in IRC and catch all the meetings and what not. A different requirement must be made. NOT RELATED TO IRC! I spend enough time on the ubuntu forums assisting others and writing very difficult and advanced guides that take me at least a few hours of testing to get it right. I don't just write guides, I test them over and over again to perfection. Although a few of them are obsolete as of today, it still shows that I am not showing a lack of commitment. Keep in mind that I am not just saying this about me. This goes for all experienced Ubuntu users. Especially the ones who have no known reputation for the forums. I know many users in the forums that deserve to be an Ubuntu member however, they don't play long enough in IRC, and make as many posts as others.

wolterh
March 16th, 2009, 05:38 AM
You are not understanding the point. I don't want to be declared as a member just for using ubuntu and contributing on levels which I think are considered below the member levels, I rather want to be given the priviledge of using an @ubuntu.com email address, not because I am a member (which I am not) or because I want to steal what others work hard for, but because I help the system grow. Now, creating a domain, which I'd have to pay for, is not only against my principles, but it also looks unofficial and It wouldn't feel the same.

Members can keep every other feature, or even be given an @ubuntu-member email address, or something that will augment their prestige; what they've earned so far.

sdennie
March 16th, 2009, 05:40 AM
Ubuntu membership is open to everyone and the link to the membership process has already been posted in this thread.

I'm not sure where the sense of entitlement that a few have expressed in this thread comes from but, apply the same to Firefox. Does using Firefox entitle you to a @mozilla.org e-mail address? Does being an expert in about:config entitle you to one? It doesn't. But, like the @ubuntu e-mail address, a sustained and noticeable contribution to the community, in whatever capacity you are capable of, is likely to earn you one if you are willing to then put in the time to apply/petition for it.

I have an @ubuntu.com e-mail address and I'd love to see more people with them. It's not an exclusive club, it's a growing club as more and more people start to make contributions to the community. The more people with @ubuntu.com addresses the better in my opinion. But, I don't want to see them (and I don't think they ever will be) handed out because people think they have a right to them. I like to see them handed out because people have earned them.

mb_webguy
March 16th, 2009, 05:43 AM
You are not understanding the point. [...] Members can keep every other feature [...]I do understand your point. And what I'm saying is that the Ubuntu email address is essentially the only benefit that members get, other than the right to print their own official Ubuntu business cards. Giving an Ubuntu email to every user diminishes the prestige of membership -- and prestige is really all they get.

Does using Firefox entitle you to a @mozilla.org e-mail address?
+1, and thank you for your contribution, sdennie.

wolterh
March 16th, 2009, 05:49 AM
Well, its a good thing we finally gathered the forces to pull in a member to the thread. I think that your reason is...reasonable. But well, I have made contributions that though not as big as patching any essential part of ubuntu, should be recognized. I will link you to my personal wiki page, and I want you to comment here why I should not be a member.

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WolterHellmund

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 05:49 AM
I do understand your point. And what I'm saying is that the Ubuntu email address is essentially the only benefit that members get, other than the right to print their own official Ubuntu business cards. Giving an Ubuntu email to every user diminishes the prestige of membership -- and prestige is really all they get.

+1, and thank you for your contribution, sdennie.

I think he was talking to me when he said, "You are not understanding the point."

sgosnell
March 16th, 2009, 05:50 AM
Come on children, grow up.

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 05:55 AM
Come on children, grow up.

I prefer not to be called a child even though I am not an adult yet. Anyway back to the topic, I wouldn't mind just having the @ubuntu domain for my email or irc client even though I wouldn't be a member. Having an "@ymail" email address can confuse people over the phone when calling up an electronics company.

"Sir, can I have your email address?"
"Sure. n-e-o-t-h-e-u-s-e-r at why mail dot com."
"The letter Y and then mail or w-h-y mail?"
"The letter Y."
"OK so I have n-e-o-t-h-e-u-s-e-r at why mail dot com. Is this correct?"
"Yes."

When it could just be:

"Sir, can I have your email address?"
"Sure. n-e-o-t-h-e-u-s-e-r at u-b-u-n-t-u dot com."
"Thank you. What were you calling about?"

I go through that on a daily basis.

sdennie
March 16th, 2009, 05:57 AM
Well, its a good thing we finally gathered the forces to pull in a member to the thread. I think that your reason is...reasonable. But well, I have made contributions that though not as big as patching any essential part of ubuntu, should be recognized. I will link you to my personal wiki page, and I want you to comment here why I should not be a member.

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WolterHellmund

My suggestion to you would be look at the membership process and then look at the wiki pages of various members to see what they have contributed and how they have structured their wiki pages. Attend a meeting in #ubuntu-meetings on IRC (it's passive and you don't need to (and probably shouldn't) say anything) to observe how the process is done so you have an idea of what is going to be expected of you and then apply.

Here are some links to get you started:
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Membership
https://launchpad.net/~ubuntumembers
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Membership/RegionalBoards

mb_webguy
March 16th, 2009, 05:59 AM
Having an "@ymail" email address can confuse people over the phone when calling up an electronics company.

So get a Yahoo account, or an account from some other provider whose name is easier to communicate. But I really don't think that's a good argument for getting an Ubuntu email account.

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 06:00 AM
My suggestion to you would be look at the membership process and then look at the wiki pages of various members to see what they have contributed and how they have structured their wiki pages. Attend a meeting in #ubuntu-meetings on IRC (it's passive and you don't need to (and probably shouldn't) say anything) to observe how the process is done so you have an idea of what is going to be expected of you and then apply.

Here are some links to get you started:
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Membership
https://launchpad.net/~ubuntumembers
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Membership/RegionalBoards

What about the people who don't have the time to go through that but have already did their share of the bargain?

lisati
March 16th, 2009, 06:06 AM
I have a ymail email address (hosted by Yahoo) and have "ubuntu" as part of the username - that is enough for me.

BTW: I think someone has spidered the forums because I haven't given out my ymail address to anyone but have it on my forum profile, and about the only email I get through it is from rogues with "business propositions".

sdennie
March 16th, 2009, 06:11 AM
What about the people who don't have the time to go through that but have already did their share of the bargain?

Part of the "bargain" is showing your commitment by taking the process seriously. It's not a small task to become an Ubuntu member and that's probably why it's viewed as exclusive. Regardless of your contributions, you have to apply just like everyone else (even Mark Shuttleworth had to apply).

When I applied, I was part of the forum staff, had thousands of posts on the forums, was active in my LoCo, was active in IRC, had written various tutorials, had done a community interview, etc and I was still nervous about application. That's why I suggested you look at what other members have contributed and weigh your contributions against theirs before applying. From what I've seen, if you do apply and are not accepted, the council will give you suggestions on what you should do to be considered and not just outright dismiss you but, it's best to come prepared regardless.

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 06:20 AM
When I applied, I was part of the forum staff, had thousands of posts on the forums, was active in my LoCo, was active in IRC, had written various tutorials, had done a community interview, etc and I was still nervous about application.

In that case, I won't bother trying to become an Ubuntu member. I feel as if I deserve something more than an @ubuntu email address and have an Ubuntu member label next to my name if what I do isn't even close to enough. This reminds me of Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare (yes I have a point, let me finish) when people would constantly go into Prestige Mode and reset all their points, ranks, weapons, camouflage, and all that stuff to get a special symbol next to their name. Completely pointless if you don't get anything else in return. I'd feel cheated if I did Prestige Mode which is why I didn't do it. Same reason I won't go through all the trouble of being an Ubuntu member. It's not like I'd get free Ubuntu hats or sweatshirts or anything even close to that. (Just like in Prestige Mode in Call Of Duty 4, you don't get any new weapons or anything.)

I'm not here to show off my Ubuntu Member tag on my profile to get people to think I'm cool. I'm here to help out. Nothing more.

sdennie
March 16th, 2009, 06:25 AM
In that case, I won't bother trying to become an Ubuntu member. I feel as if I deserve something more than an @ubuntu email address and have an Ubuntu member label next to my name if what I do isn't even close to enough. This reminds me of Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare (yes I have a point, let me finish) when people would constantly go into Prestige Mode and reset all their points, ranks, weapons, camouflage, and all that stuff to get a special symbol next to their name. Completely pointless if you don't get anything else in return. I'd feel cheated if I did Prestige Mode which is why I didn't do it. Same reason I won't go through all the trouble of being an Ubuntu member. It's not like I'd get free Ubuntu hats or sweatshirts or anything even close to that. (Just like in Prestige Mode in Call Of Duty 4, you don't get any new weapons or anything.)

Then I think you are missing the point of becoming an Ubuntu member. It's not about feeling your contributions deserve to be compensated by free hats and sweatshirts. It's about taking the next step in becoming a more integral part of a community you enjoy being a part of.

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 06:31 AM
Then I think you are missing the point of becoming an Ubuntu member. It's not about feeling your contributions deserve to be compensated by free hats and sweatshirts. It's about taking the next step in becoming a more integral part of a community you enjoy being a part of.

I'm not so good at speeches or making myself sound important either. I bet the only reason stopping me from becoming an Ubuntu member (besides time) would be the way I write. Going to bed. night guys.

sdennie
March 16th, 2009, 06:46 AM
I'm not so good at speeches or making myself sound important either. I bet the only reason stopping me from becoming an Ubuntu member (besides time) would be the way I write.

Not likely. All the regional boards for membership deal with multiple languages and so are accustomed to varying degrees of proficiency with the languages. You aren't judged on how eloquently you speak but by what you have done and, to a lesser degree, what you plan to do in the future. An inability to express yourself is not a reason to not apply. If you really feel it's an issue, using a translator for both your wiki and IRC interview seems perfectly reasonable to me. If a translator can better express your contributions than you can, what's the harm. Even if the translator is translating from English to English.

(Note: I don't speak for the boards. Maybe English to English translation is frowned upon).

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 03:53 PM
English is my one language (besides C) and I'm terrible at it and when they ask me why I think I should be an Ubuntu member, I wouldn't know what to say. OK back to the topic that doesn't apply to just me...

If somebody ported many chipsets to Coreboot (LinuxBIOS) or made several major commits to the linux kernel tree, and made several Ubuntu packages that nobody would ever make, that person should automatically just be accepted when they ask if they can be an Ubuntu member and get the @ubuntu email domain. They need to lower the standards. Seriously. They should also look at your projects that you've done.

Back to me again....

If somebody writes this kind of software then they should be an Ubuntu member and get the email address ASAP. I have many results on google for developing software. Examples:

http://www.pastebin.ca/1079796
http://pastebin.ca/1277059

Keep in mind that I also have thousands of other lines of source code developed by me and my PS3Brewery team that I started up along with an old friend.

I also make guides on the forums. OK so I've committed to a degree and I'm a programmer and I'm sure others in the forums may be as well, but what does this have to do with Ubuntu? I will tell you. The programming for the Playstation 3 and PSP and all that plus Mesa bug fixes shows to what I can do if given the opportunity for Ubuntu development. ...I'm still not a MOTU yet and many others are still waiting. If somebody has a reputation like me, they should be an Ubuntu member and get the email address. The fact that somebody hangs in irc for a certain amount of time and participates in the meetings should NOT be a requirement. More actual skill should be looked at. It should be difficult to be an Ubuntu member, but not this difficult.

Keep in mind: everytime I said Ubuntu member, I also meant the email address. It's just not fair. This entire post also applies to all software engineers, developers, programmers of any kind. Not just me.

I'm guessing that when people that used to might actually give me a chance to be an Ubuntu member, they will see these posts and be like, "Oh, he's just another one of those 1337 haxors." It's not like the ONLY thing I'm able to do is Playstation stuff and Mesa. When I first started programming about 4 or 5 years ago when I was around 12, I started out with Basic and I made simple windows video games like Invaderz. I was just a little kid at the time though. I believe that me and many other developers all have to start somewhere and I believe that more people should be an Ubuntu member such as the Green Book Hackers, former M33 Team developers, and commit to bug fixes of third-party linux related projects, such as linux kernels, mesa, open source drivers of any kind, wine developers and everything along those lines. These people have shown their commitment. Why does IRC need to be a requirement? Not everybody has time for it, not everybody has time for meetings or chit-chat. It's the PREVIOUS commitment that should be looked at. Their reputation as a whole. Not just recent commitment such as attending the next Ubuntu meeting. For example, if Linus Torvalds wanted to be an Ubuntu member (lets not go off topic and discuss whether he would try to be one or not) he should be accepted right on the dot without question. I hope you all understood my point.

The real point and the bottom line
Past commitment to future commitment. Not just future commitment like meetings. Everything should be looked at as a WHOLE. And for those who say this is already the case, why aren't all the people who have a phenomenal reputation aren't Ubuntu forums with the email address? I could make a pretty long list on who I think should be an Ubuntu member but I have no say in any of this so there is no point and... I rather not point fingers at the experts. ;)

^ ENTIRE POST APPLIES TO ALL SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS AND TO THOSE WHO DESERVE TO BE AN UBUNTU MEMBER DUE TO A HUGE REPUTATION! EVERYTIME I SAID UBUNTU MEMBER, I MEANT INCLUDING THE EMAIL ADDRESS!

bapoumba
March 16th, 2009, 07:30 PM
Moved to Community Cafe (was in Cafe Games :confused:)

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 07:32 PM
Moved to Community Cafe (was in Cafe Games :confused:)

lawlz no wai!

Mr. Picklesworth
March 16th, 2009, 07:38 PM
Neo, have you applied and been rejected, or are you just assuming? The mailing list types tend to be quite friendly ;)

namegame
March 16th, 2009, 07:40 PM
I really don't get the sense of entitlement.

Anyway, as I understand it, becoming an Ubuntu memeber is an active process, not passive. They just don't hand them out to people. If you want to be a member YOU need to apply for membership. It's that simple. If you're really as qualifed as you claim to be, you should have no problem recieving membership. :)

Keyper7
March 16th, 2009, 08:19 PM
The way I see it, the @ubuntu suffix works as an identifier and as an official channel of communication between Ubuntu Members. I don't think separating the concepts of Ubuntu Member and "person with @ubuntu address" is a good idea, because it's like a business email.

Becoming a Member is not a prize. It's a title that increases your responsibilities. Members receive that address so that they can use it for Ubuntu-related business.

bobbocanfly
March 16th, 2009, 08:27 PM
If somebody ported many chipsets to Coreboot (LinuxBIOS) or made several major commits to the linux kernel tree, and made several Ubuntu packages that nobody would ever make, that person should automatically just be accepted when they ask if they can be an Ubuntu member and get the @ubuntu email domain. They need to lower the standards. Seriously. They should also look at your projects that you've done.

Ubuntu membership is mainly judged on direct contributions to the Ubuntu project. Contributing to an upstream project (though a great thing to do in general) shouldn't really count towards Ubuntu membership. Ubuntu memberships are for people that have made a sustained and noticable contribution to Ubuntu, not the Coreboot or Linux Kernel projects. If we started giving out Ubuntu memberships (and therefore email addresses) to all the authors of the upstream projects in Ubuntu, then Canonical would need to be buying a new server farm to power the forwarding. There are thousands, (if not tens of thousands) of people who have commits in upstream software in Ubuntu, giving them @ubuntu.com addresses just isnt feasible.



Keep in mind that I also have thousands of other lines of source code developed by me and my PS3Brewery team that I started up along with an old friend.

PS3Brewery isn't related to the Ubuntu project, why does committing code to it entitle you to an Ubuntu email address?



I'm still not a MOTU yet and many others are still waiting. If somebody has a reputation like me, they should be an Ubuntu member and get the email address.

You say you are working towards MOTU, well done, and good luck with it. Unfortunately the second sentence isn't quite as admirable. I am a MOTU and haven't seen you around (OK, I haven't been particularly active recently, but still keep an eye on the sponsorship queue and MOTU/Contributing developer applications) in the community. This doesn't bode well for your "reuptation" in the Ubuntu community (your contributions to which is what Ubuntu membership eligibility is judged on)



The fact that somebody hangs in irc for a certain amount of time and participates in the meetings should NOT be a requirement. More actual skill should be looked at.

The purpose of the IRC meetings is to look at the applicants skill/contributions. Trust me, idling on IRC doesn't get you Ubuntu membership.



It should be difficult to be an Ubuntu member, but not this difficult.

Why not? A "sustained and noticable" contribution to a project such as Ubuntu isn't an easy thing to do. Membership is designed as both a reward for those who do give a sustained and noticable contribution and as an incentive for people to work on the project.




I'm guessing that when people that used to might actually give me a chance to be an Ubuntu member, they will see these posts and be like, "Oh, he's just another one of those 1337 haxors." It's not like the ONLY thing I'm able to do is Playstation stuff and Mesa. When I first started programming about 4 or 5 years ago when I was around 12, I started out with Basic and I made simple windows video games like Invaderz. I was just a little kid at the time though. I believe that me and many other developers all have to start somewhere and I believe that more people should be an Ubuntu member such as the Green Book Hackers, former M33 Team developers, and commit to bug fixes of third-party linux related projects, such as linux kernels, mesa, open source drivers of any kind, wine developers and everything along those lines.

Membership is judged on more than programming. Packaging (MOTU work), bug triage, LoCo team participation and artwork are also looked at.



Why does IRC need to be a requirement? Not everybody has time for it, not everybody has time for meetings or chit-chat.

I think you aren't understanding the IRC part of the membership application process. The IRC meetings are designed for the membership board members to check your contributions and ask you any questions etc. then give you feedback and finally a decision on your membership.

These meetings have recently been streamlined and seriously don't last long. If you aren't willing to give up an hour or two to have Xchat open in the background, then are you sure you want to be a member?

Alternatively, if you go through the MOTU processes with packaging etc. you can apply for Ubuntu Contributing Developer status which certifies you are on the way to MOTUship and also rewards you by giving you all the perks of Membership. This is done via email and though takes much longer to get a decision (several weeks is normal, and is an age compared to just a few hours), it doesn't require you to be on IRC, which you seemed to seriously be against.



For example, if Linus Torvalds wanted to be an Ubuntu member (lets not go off topic and discuss whether he would try to be one or not) he should be accepted right on the dot without question. I hope you all understood my point.


Apart from starting off the Kernel, I don't think Linus has made any direct contributions to Ubuntu. Therefore, if I was on the membership board, I'd have to reject him.

I didn't want this post to seem like a rant against you, it's just you seemed a bit misinformed about the whole process and I wanted to help you.

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 08:41 PM
that was long. I read it all and I understood it all but I disagree with many of the things you said and I'm not writing a book explaining everything. I am not really on wobi's side either because I don't think literally everybody should be given the @ubuntu email address but only the ones who know what they are doing. And you would reject linus torvalds yet me on the other hand actually has a shot according to namegame? If it wasn't for linus, ubuntu wouldn't exist (unless if Greg-K Hartman would've founded the linux kernel) so I think that comment is just absurd.

"Umm... Neo you seem like you commited to Ubuntu. You've written some guides, etc... Sure I'll let you in. Umm... Linus, haven't seen any posts in the forums by you. Sorry."

haahhahahaahaha!!! that's hilarious!!!

@Namegame:

they should pick people. I ain't going to any meetings.

P.S. I know PS3Brewery isn't related to Ubuntu but it comes to show that just because somebody doesn't make forum posts a lot and goes to IRC doesn't mean they aren't really good at software and aren't able to incredible things with Ubuntu. What I'm saying is, all those third party projects not related to Ubuntu doesn't mean they don't know what they are doing and it makes them legible to be an Ubuntu member.

sdennie
March 16th, 2009, 08:51 PM
"Umm... Neo you seem like you commited to Ubuntu. You've written some guides, etc... Sure I'll let you in. Umm... Linus, haven't seen any posts in the forums by you. Sorry."

haahhahahaahaha!!! that's hilarious!!!


It might seem hilarious but, that's likely how the meeting would go. Linus contributes to Linux as a whole but, he doesn't make direct contributions to the Ubuntu community. Writing a key upstream component of Ubuntu doesn't qualify you for membership.



they should pick people.


They do pick people. The ones who apply for membership.



I ain't going to any meetings.

Then you will never be an Ubuntu member. Unless you go the Contributing Developer route which sounds like it might be more appropriate for you.

Edit:


P.S. I know PS3Brewery isn't related to Ubuntu but it comes to show that just because somebody doesn't make forum posts a lot and goes to IRC doesn't mean they aren't really good at software and aren't able to incredible things with Ubuntu. What I'm saying is, all those third party projects not related to Ubuntu doesn't mean they don't know what they are doing and it makes them legible to be an Ubuntu member.


Knowing a lot doesn't earn you membership. Millions of people know a lot about Linux and so indirectly Ubuntu. It's sharing that knowledge/expertise with the community that membership is about.

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 08:54 PM
Explain this developer route to me. Will it show up like a tag next to my name? If so, I'll try and get in. Developing shows more commitment than a member. Developing is a whole different story than an Ubuntu member. Do I get the email address???????? This whole developing thing sounds so interesting. I hope I get the tag and email address!!! The developing I will apply for meetings to and all that. I will do whatever it takes.

sdennie
March 16th, 2009, 08:56 PM
Explain this developer route to me. Will it show up like a tag next to my name? If so, I'll try and get in. Developing shows more commitment than a member. Developing is a whole different story than an Ubuntu member. Do I get the email address???????? This whole developing thing sounds so interesting. I hope I get the tag and email address!!! The developing I will apply for meetings to and all that. I will do whatever it takes.

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuDevelopers

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 09:00 PM
Thanks. I will dig through that and read all through it then hopefully I can commit to Ubuntu via developing and get an even bigger reputation. Pretty soon vlc, ps3, psp, and mesa developers won't be the only ones who have heard of me. XD SO HAPPY!!! but... do i get the tag and email address??? thats all i really care about. i mean i'll develop and program but only for those 2 things (well plus helping out.)

mips
March 16th, 2009, 09:04 PM
I really don't get the sense of entitlement.



It's part of the society we live in.

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 09:07 PM
It's part of the society we live in.

I don't get the sense of entitlement for Ubuntu member. Ubuntu developer is so much more awesome!!! i hope to get i get the tag and email address. to show people that i helped destroy microsoft windows, to show that i helped out in a big way, to show that i'm totally awesome and helpful!

namegame
March 16th, 2009, 09:10 PM
I can... get an even bigger reputation... won't be the only ones who have heard of me. XD SO HAPPY!!! but... do i get the tag and email address??? thats all i really care about. i mean i'll develop and program but only for those 2 things (well plus helping out.)

If I were judging your candidacy, I would reject you. You only want to be labelled as "better than" everyone else. To me, it looks like you are just trying to increase the size of your ego...and not actually contribute to the success of the Ubuntu project. FOSS isn't about being famous, it's about the success of the community as a whole, not the individuals. Yes, there are some big names, Shuttleworth, Torvalds, Stallman, etc. But their fame was a by-product of their work, not a goal...


i hope to get i get the tag and email address. to show people that i helped destroy microsoft windows, to show that i helped out in a big way, to show that i'm totally awesome and helpful!

And this statement is a wonderful conclusion to my point. It's about you and your ego...

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 09:12 PM
If I were judging your candidacy, I would reject you. You only want to be labelled as "better than" everyone else. To me, it looks like you are just trying to increase the size of your ego...and not actually contribute to the success of the Ubuntu project. FOSS isn't about being famous, it's about the success of the community as a whole, not the individuals. Yes, there are some big names, Shuttleworth, Torvalds, Stallman, etc. But their fame was a by-product of their work, not a goal...

No I just want the cool tag and email address. And I'll enjoy doing whatever it takes to get the tag and email address because I'll be programming. My favorite! I'm doing this to help out. If I didn't want to help I wouldn't be a developer. Developing is making a commitment. and yes I admit I have a huge ego but as long as I get the job done, who cares? I submit my patches and stuff and I get the tag and email address. Strictly business. Nothing more. No friends, no fitting in, no buddy-buddy. Just take my code and gimme tag and email address! That's what being a developer is about. Developing. And I want to develop to help and get tag and email address. I have a big ego, true. But the tag and email address is a perfect excuse to show off. All everybody really cares about is just the programming itself, at least in all the projects I committed to. Nobody really cares why you do it or why you like doing it or the point of it if you don't get paid. They just want the source code and bugs to be fixed, and source code and bug fixes they shall have in return of the tag and email address.

bobbocanfly
March 16th, 2009, 09:18 PM
Thanks. I will dig through that and read all through it then hopefully I can commit to Ubuntu via developing and get an even bigger reputation. Pretty soon vlc, ps3, psp, and mesa developers won't be the only ones who have heard of me. XD SO HAPPY!!! but... do i get the tag and email address??? thats all i really care about. i mean i'll develop and program but only for those 2 things (well plus helping out.)

Yes you get the membership stuff when you get accepted as an Ubuntu Contributing Developer (which takes about 4 - 6 months of committed packaging/development). It took me 6 months of work to get UUC, then a further 6 for MOTU status.

Audrey Hepburn on Crack
March 16th, 2009, 09:19 PM
Well, first off it would require running a mail server. That takes time and money.

Could be hosted through gmail and be free and still @ubuntu.com

Except it could not be @ubuntu.org that domain is owned by http://www.ubuntu.upc.edu/

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 09:21 PM
Yes you get the membership stuff when you get accepted as an Ubuntu Contributing Developer (which takes about 4 - 6 months of committed packaging/development). It took me 6 months of work to get UUC, then a further 6 for MOTU status.

UUC is making a hello world application right? I've made several for the PS3, PSP, and windows boxes. I'm sure I could do it on Ubuntu in about 30 seconds written in java depending on typing speed. Did Audrey Hepburn just get banned?

Therion
March 16th, 2009, 09:23 PM
No I just want the cool tag and email address. ...
No offense, friend, but I think there is an aspect of being chosen for Membership that you are simply not understanding.
I'm also under the impression that no amount of anyone's trying to explain it to you is going to get it across.

bobbocanfly
March 16th, 2009, 09:23 PM
UUC is making a hello world application right? I've made several for the PS3, PSP, and windows boxes. I'm sure I could do it on Ubuntu in about 30 seconds written in java depending on typing speed.

Err no, if you read my post correctly, UUC is 4 - 6 months of dedicated packaging/developing work, directly contributing it to Ubuntu. I think just about anyone on these forums could type out a Hello World program in a few minutes with a little help from Google.

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 09:28 PM
Err no, if you read my post correctly, UUC is 4 - 6 months of dedicated packaging/developing work, directly contributing it to Ubuntu. I think just about anyone on these forums could type out a Hello World program in a few minutes with a little help from Google.

How much experience with C do you need to become a MOTU and all that? I don't know much low-level programming except reverse engineering some BIOSes used in Alienware computers that my friends have (can't install Ubuntu on Alienware with the stock BIOS) so.. yeah.

23meg
March 16th, 2009, 09:29 PM
I submit my patches and stuff and I get the tag and email address. Strictly business. Nothing more. No friends, no fitting in, no buddy-buddy. Just take my code and gimme tag and email address!

"Source code and bug fixes" isn't something you can do in Ubuntu (to the extent that it will bring you Ubuntu membership by itself) without actively participating in the development and QA communities.

Developing free software has an inseparable social aspect to it. If you're so wary of liaising with other individuals and groups as you've put so far (to the extent that you don't want to attend a half hour IRC meeting), I don't think you'll be able to contribute anything significant to a large and community-developed project like Ubuntu. I'd recommend that you start by learning how the various development and QA related teams operate, since it's their existing processes that you'll be working within and contributing "source code and bug fixes" through.

bobbocanfly
March 16th, 2009, 09:30 PM
How much experience with C do you need to become a MOTU and all that? I don't know much low-level programming except reverse engineering some BIOSes used in Alienware computers that my friends have (can't install Ubuntu on Alienware with the stock BIOS) so.. yeah.

Not very much. If you know how to write a Makefile you can do most packaging work, and most Ubuntu development is just fixing bugs in applications (normally Python, Perl, C or C++, you can pick and choose what you want to fix) and updating the packaging.

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 09:32 PM
No challenge for me then! Ubuntu developing tag and email here I come! I PICK MESA BUG FIXES FOR UBUNTU!

bapoumba
March 16th, 2009, 09:36 PM
No challenge for me then! Ubuntu developing tag and email here I come! I PICK MESA BUG FIXES FOR UBUNTU!
Just do it, see you there, on the meeting :)

namegame
March 16th, 2009, 09:39 PM
No challenge for me then! Ubuntu developing tag and email here I come! I PICK MESA BUG FIXES FOR UBUNTU!

Good luck. I hope you prove the cynics in this thread, including myself, wrong...

mips
March 16th, 2009, 09:46 PM
...to show people that i helped destroy microsoft windows...


I can only sigh...

namegame
March 16th, 2009, 09:50 PM
I can only sigh...

I agree with you totally...hopefully the "council" or whatever that reviews membership, will see this thread...

jimi_hendrix
March 16th, 2009, 09:51 PM
Um... there's a big difference between an Ubuntu user and an Ubuntu member. Are you writing code or creating artwork for the next release of Ubuntu? Are you dredging through the new help pages to translate them to Afrikaans or Urdu? If you're not doing this sort of thing or otherwise making a "significant and visible" contribution to Ubuntu, then you're a user, but not a member.


not all of us are artists or can hack kernel source or speak two languages fluently...and i think the name member should be changed to something like 'contributer'

linuxisevolution
March 16th, 2009, 09:53 PM
The server's here are so overloaded if we get 10,000 more requests I think they might melt! Maybe if Canonical gets 2 or 3 more servers AND the money for more bandwith...

bobbocanfly
March 16th, 2009, 09:56 PM
not all of us are artists or can hack kernel source or speak two languages fluently...and i think the name member should be changed to something like 'contributer'

Who said anything about hacking kernel source? I can't hack kernel source (Hell, I can barely do anything in C and I am not a particularly good Python programmer either) and I'm an Ubuntu dev. Packaging is a lot simpler than it sounds, all you need is some basic bash/scripting knowledge (not particularly difficult), a bit of patience and a willingness to learn.

Alternatively, you could do bug triage, which is just turning not-so-useful bug reports into useful bug reports by tagging things, and asking the original reporter some useful questions. The skills used in triage aren't particularly difficult to learn and shouldn't take too long (an afternoon reading the Ubuntu wiki bug pages and you will probably know more than me and be ready to jump right in and help out massively).

jimi_hendrix
March 16th, 2009, 10:01 PM
Who said anything about hacking kernel source? I can't hack kernel source (Hell, I can barely do anything in C and I am not a particularly good Python programmer either) and I'm an Ubuntu dev. Packaging is a lot simpler than it sounds, all you need is some basic bash/scripting knowledge (not particularly difficult), a bit of patience and a willingness to learn.


oh i know packaging...where can i go and contribute

Neo_The_User
March 16th, 2009, 10:32 PM
Who said anything about hacking kernel source? I can't hack kernel source (Hell, I can barely do anything in C and I am not a particularly good Python programmer either) and I'm an Ubuntu dev. Packaging is a lot simpler than it sounds, all you need is some basic bash/scripting knowledge (not particularly difficult), a bit of patience and a willingness to learn.

So I should have no problem getting in. I only know C++ and C though. No python. meh its still hard to get it. I can't just submit source code and packages, boom boom. all these channels and stuff you have to go through. I give up. im not wasting my time. they should just review custom source code packages and review .deb packages and upload it if its good. i didn't understand the whole MOTU thing before but now I see its a total mess. I'll just stick with mesa development. you know why? You send your source code in via git, wait a few hours, and thats it. I mean, thats all!

just gimme email address because i asked for it. i'm with wobi 100% now. I agree with him all the way up and down. Wobi, I think everybody should have the @ubuntu email address just because. no reason. just that. anyway, back to REAL developing.

lethalfang
March 16th, 2009, 11:15 PM
If it's that important to you, then you can register a domain yourself, such as "ubuntu-member.org" (which is apparently available, btw), and provide the service yourself.

As I said in my previous post, membership is a mark of honor, and members get very few perks. Actually, if you don't count the responsibility to participate in the Community Council, the only perks they actually get are the email mask and the right to carry official Ubuntu business cards (which they have to print themselves, btw). So by giving all Ubuntu users an Ubuntu email address, you're taking away half of the benefits of membership!

I disagree.
I dare you come up with a more cost-effective ways to advertise Ubuntu than to have a bunch of people sending emails with "@ubuntu.com" addresses. Only a forwarding address is necessary to get that accomplished.
It's about marketing.

suitedaces
March 16th, 2009, 11:21 PM
For what it's worth, I love using ubuntu, but I know I contribute very very little to the process. I reckon it would be grossly unfair if I got the same level of "recognition" as the core developers and guys who give up their time to provide this OS for us.

I can see where the posters who want an ubuntu address for all users are coming from, but I don't think it would be right.

coolbrook
March 16th, 2009, 11:44 PM
The last thing I need is another e-mail address.

wolterh
March 16th, 2009, 11:50 PM
You should know by now that @ubuntu is not an email service, but just a 'link' to your email addres.

sdennie
March 17th, 2009, 12:11 AM
I disagree.
I dare you come up with a more cost-effective ways to advertise Ubuntu than to have a bunch of people sending emails with "@ubuntu.com" addresses. Only a forwarding address is necessary to get that accomplished.
It's about marketing.

A user is not by default a representative of the community. To put a different spin on what I've already said on the second page, do you think Microsoft should hand out @microsoft.com e-mail addresses to everyone who uses Windows? Obviously not. The same applies here. There is no reason to give out @ubuntu.com e-mail address except to those people who are more or less representatives of some part of the community.

The idea that it is good for marketing is not a good one in my opinion because it misleads people into thinking that any particular user is associated with Ubuntu. If someone wants to start an e-mail forward service with a domain name of ubuntu-user.com and hand those addresses out to anyone who wants them, then, yes, I'm all for it. It has the same marketing value you are suggesting while still leaving the original idea behind @ubuntu.com intact.

wolterh
March 17th, 2009, 12:31 AM
Sdennie, really, if you want to get into OS talk, then don't forget to mention mac. Mac gives a @mac email address to those who buy it, but ubuntu is a free system, unlike mac. Ubuntu, according to that, should distribute these for free, but I don't mean to say that. I did, in a beginning, but now I know it's true: the @ubuntu.com email address is one of the little pleasing details members recieve for their work.

sdennie
March 17th, 2009, 12:32 AM
Sdennie, really, if you want to get into OS talk, then don't forget to mention mac. Mac gives a @mac email address to those who buy it, but ubuntu is a free system, unlike mac. Ubuntu, according to that, should distribute these for free, but I don't mean to say that. I did, in a beginning, but now I know it's true: the @ubuntu.com email address is one of the little pleasing details members recieve for their work.

But, they don't give @apple.com e-mail addresses.

sgosnell
March 17th, 2009, 12:37 AM
If you don't want to be called a child, don't act like a child. Throwing tantrums and demanding that someone give you what you want right now, just because you want it, is acting like a child, and if you act that way, that's the way you'll be judged. You don't even show the maturity of a 16-year-old, much less an adult. Being able to code doesn't make you grown-up, nor does it give you any rights at all. If you want another email address, get one. There are lots of them available for free. I have to say that if I read this thread and used it to decide on your membership in almost anything, I would have to decide on 'no'.

Yashiro
March 17th, 2009, 12:40 AM
Hey can we have ubuntu mail addresses?
Ok
Umm can we access our mail with a browser?
Hmm
How about IMAP support?
Arr
Hey can I import my exchange contacts?
Urr
What about an Iphone app?
And so on.

When does it end? :P

On the other hand if Ubuntu is serious about cloud computing an Ubuntu backed suite similar to Apples MobileMe might be something to look at.

wolterh
March 17th, 2009, 12:43 AM
But, they don't give @apple.com e-mail addresses.

As to reply that, we are not asking for @canonical email addresses. @mac would be the equivalent.

But no Yashiro, ubuntu is no email service provider. It rather provides, as I stated before, the service to link your email address of preference to an @ubuntu.com email address.

Mehall
March 17th, 2009, 12:57 AM
As to reply that, we are not asking for @canonical email addresses. @mac would be the equivalent.

But no Yashiro, ubuntu is no email service provider. It rather provides, as I stated before, the service to link your email address of preference to an @ubuntu.com email address.

Well can I just point out, even if all it does is redirect to a diff server, theyd need to have a server doing that, and that workload gets heavier the more it's used.

sdennie
March 17th, 2009, 01:06 AM
As to reply that, we are not asking for @canonical email addresses. @mac would be the equivalent.


It's not the equivalent. @apple represents an Apple employee and @mac represents someone who has bought a mac. @canonical represents a paid employee of Canonical while @ubuntu represents a recognized member of the Ubuntu community. Apple isn't the sponsor of an open source community so, there is no need for them to have the second level of community recognition that Canonical/Ubuntu has.

This is why I suggested @ubuntu-user. If your goal is to identify yourself as an Ubuntu user then what is the difference between an @ubuntu and @ubuntu-user e-mail address? Both make it obvious that you are an advocate of Ubuntu. Why are (a very tiny portion of) people so adamant on getting an @ubuntu.com e-mail address? It makes no sense unless your underlying motives are to gain undue recognition for other peoples work.

lethalfang
March 17th, 2009, 01:40 AM
A user is not by default a representative of the community. To put a different spin on what I've already said on the second page, do you think Microsoft should hand out @microsoft.com e-mail addresses to everyone who uses Windows? Obviously not. The same applies here. There is no reason to give out @ubuntu.com e-mail address except to those people who are more or less representatives of some part of the community.

The idea that it is good for marketing is not a good one in my opinion because it misleads people into thinking that any particular user is associated with Ubuntu. If someone wants to start an e-mail forward service with a domain name of ubuntu-user.com and hand those addresses out to anyone who wants them, then, yes, I'm all for it. It has the same marketing value you are suggesting while still leaving the original idea behind @ubuntu.com intact.

gmail.com
googlemail.com

As for @mac vs. @apple, I'm sure they're creative enough to come up with something else that's distinctively Ubuntu if they want to.

lethalfang
March 17th, 2009, 01:45 AM
It's not the equivalent. @apple represents an Apple employee and @mac represents someone who has bought a mac. @canonical represents a paid employee of Canonical while @ubuntu represents a recognized member of the Ubuntu community. Apple isn't the sponsor of an open source community so, there is no need for them to have the second level of community recognition that Canonical/Ubuntu has.

This is why I suggested @ubuntu-user. If your goal is to identify yourself as an Ubuntu user then what is the difference between an @ubuntu and @ubuntu-user e-mail address? Both make it obvious that you are an advocate of Ubuntu. Why are (a very tiny portion of) people so adamant on getting an @ubuntu.com e-mail address? It makes no sense unless your underlying motives are to gain undue recognition for other peoples work.

The overwhelming majority of people who want @ubuntu.com address are ones who want to advocate on Ubuntu's behalf.

I, personally, don't care and wouldn't want another email address. I certainly will not use a forwarding address from an OS company.

Recognition?
Why would anyone feel recognized simply because he has an @ubuntu email address?

namegame
March 17th, 2009, 01:48 AM
Recognition?
Why would anyone feel recognized simply because he has an @ubuntu email address?

Because of the contributions/commitment the individual has given to the community. Those people that know what it takes to become an Ubuntu member, probably respect the people with the "title."

sdennie
March 17th, 2009, 01:58 AM
gmail.com
googlemail.com


Right. As opposed to @google.com. Someone is likely to now bring up @yahoo.com. Yahoo was one of the first (if not the first) mainstream webmail providers. Their decision of providing @yahoo.com e-mail addresses to anyone that wanted them was made in the infancy of the web as we know it. They probably benefited from the "marketing" type ideas you are promoting but, I wouldn't be surprised to find that, in retrospect, they wish they'd done @ymail or @yahoo-mail.

wolterh
March 17th, 2009, 02:05 AM
It's not the equivalent. @apple represents an Apple employee and @mac represents someone who has bought a mac. @canonical represents a paid employee of Canonical while @ubuntu represents a recognized member of the Ubuntu community. Apple isn't the sponsor of an open source community so, there is no need for them to have the second level of community recognition that Canonical/Ubuntu has.


... Common...
Simply, @mac is to OS and @apple is to company as @ubuntu is to OS and @canonical is to company...

sdennie
March 17th, 2009, 02:06 AM
Recognition?
Why would anyone feel recognized simply because he has an @ubuntu email address?

Have you ever worked for a company that you were very proud of? I remember working for Sun in the late 90s and I certainly felt a sense of pride every time I sent out an external e-mail with an @sun.com address. There is nothing wrong with being proud about your associations and recognitions (in this case, recognitions by employment).

sdennie
March 17th, 2009, 02:10 AM
... Common...
Simply, @mac is to OS and @apple is to company as @ubuntu is to OS and @canonical is to company...

No. I'm not really sure how much more clear I can make this. Apple has a Company->User relationship. Canonical has a Company->Community->User relationship. Something is needed to distinguish Community and User. That thing is @ubuntu.com e-mail addresses.

Mr. Picklesworth
March 17th, 2009, 02:20 AM
Besides, @mac.com doesn't just go to Mac users. It goes to MobileMe (formerly .Mac) users. It's a regular email / calendar hosting service, just like gmail.

(Speaking of which, doesn't the FSF have an email forwarding service as well?)

sdennie
March 17th, 2009, 02:27 AM
(Speaking of which, doesn't the FSF have an email forwarding service as well?)

It does, and it's based on monthly donations (and, it also never works in my experience). It's *not* based on whether or not you contribute to software libre. It's a donation based vanity e-mail address. The @ubuntu.com e-mail address is community contribution based.

Edit:
Also, the donation based, FSF e-mail is @fsf-member.org. NOT @fsf.org...

Audrey Hepburn on Crack
March 17th, 2009, 03:24 AM
Did Audrey Hepburn just get banned?

Not to my knowledge, I am still here.

:popcorn:

About email whether it be @mac or @gmail or @ubuntumail

While I have used @mac and find it's simplicity very nice and clean I find that I would never change or leave gmail or an at gmail mail hosted domain mail @ubuntumail or @ubuntu to be successful if at all plausible (which is in serious question here in this thread of which I will remain neutral on the heated debate) would almost have to be hosted by gmail.

joey-elijah
March 17th, 2009, 04:02 AM
I wish i could learn how to do something useful to help Ubuntu - and not because i want an @ubuntu email suffix either!

I just love the community aspect and wish my contributions were more than helping people with issues i faced before but learnt how to solve. That and i have so much free time i really should do something productive...

lethalfang
March 17th, 2009, 09:40 AM
Right. As opposed to @google.com. Someone is likely to now bring up @yahoo.com. Yahoo was one of the first (if not the first) mainstream webmail providers. Their decision of providing @yahoo.com e-mail addresses to anyone that wanted them was made in the infancy of the web as we know it. They probably benefited from the "marketing" type ideas you are promoting but, I wouldn't be surprised to find that, in retrospect, they wish they'd done @ymail or @yahoo-mail.

Well, fine, create something like "@mail.ubuntu.com"

Hilko
March 17th, 2009, 10:29 AM
Why not give @ubuntu email mask to everyone?

It is a brilliant idea ! Having every Ubuntu user use an @ubuntu address is a great way to spread the name of Ubuntu to the rest of the world. In that way market ubuntu and make people curious about and more familiar with the name.

However, members deserve to be distinguished from end users for all the hard work they do. Therefore

- @use.ubuntu.com ; free for anyone who wants it.
-reserve @ubuntu.com for members only.


And those who out of curiosity type use.ubuntu.com (http://use.ubuntu.com) in their browser should find a page with a short intro about what ubuntu is, how to get started and why it is great.

Scubdup
March 17th, 2009, 10:30 AM
Interesting thread! Never seen such a short attention span before.

I'm most definitely not l33t (but I do have a @gmail email address - is that a l33t solution to having to explain that ymail is not whymail?) and quite rightly I do not have a HUGE reputation nor have I written the source code to the Matrix, but the passion in this thread kept me reading until someone mentioned Bug Triage, which sounds like a good way someone like me might be able to help out, so thanks to everyone who's posted so far.

lukjad007
March 17th, 2009, 12:33 PM
The @ubuntu e-mail address is for people who are accepted as ubuntu members. A member is member "one of the persons who compose a social group (especially individuals who have joined and participate in a group organization))". If you wish to benefit from the @ubuntu emails, you must become a member of this group. Since this is their email, and their groups, they decide the rules and requirements for membership, and nothing I, or anyone who is not an influential member says about it can make them change.

bobbocanfly
March 17th, 2009, 04:59 PM
If people are lusting after an email address with the string "ubuntu" in it, there is nothing stopping you buying a server and domain name (ubuntu-user.com seems to be free) and setting this up yourself. Of course Canonical's trademarks department will force you to take it down (Trademarks department have become very against non Canonical endorsed projects using the word Ubuntu in the name), but you could always try.

I seriously cannot see Canonical doing this, but if you want to see any movement on this I'd recommend writing up a blueprint on Launchpad then assigning Mark Shuttleworth and the Canonical sysadmins (there are a few, but Chris Jones' name springs to mind instantly) and see what they think.

Neo_The_User
March 17th, 2009, 05:40 PM
i just want email address. give me and wobi the email address now. for those who don't want it, fine. but me and wobi want it. gimme.

Bodsda
March 17th, 2009, 05:44 PM
Go and have fun

Email spoofing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-mail_spoofing)

lukjad007
March 17th, 2009, 06:25 PM
gimme.

Sorry, what?


Go and have fun

Email spoofing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-mail_spoofing)

LOL

Neo_The_User
March 17th, 2009, 07:23 PM
how do you email spoof? anybody got a HOWTO? like without actually hacking INTO anything or going way out of your way. i don't have enough computing power and enough people to help me. i do have 2 development teams that i'm pretty much in charge of but thats only 20 people. 20 software engineers hacking into stuff getting the @ubuntu email mask by spoofing? i'm sure that can't be done.

bobbocanfly
March 17th, 2009, 07:32 PM
i just want email address. give me and wobi the email address now. for those who don't want it, fine. but me and wobi want it. gimme.

A little bit OT but, are you sure you are sixteen? I mean, I am sixteen and I seriously hope I do not sound like this on the Internet? That is seriously not the way to get an @ubuntu.com email address and you seem exceptionally averse to doing any actual work in order to get one. Instead you use painfully bad English to demand one? If you are not a native English speaker, I apologize profusely, but seriously ...

Seeing as your demanding an email address is still failing to work, I'd still recommend filing a blueprint on Launchpad and subscribing sabdfl.

Good luck with your quest for an Ubuntu email address. I think I will remove myself from this thread before I start to break things in an uncontrollable rage :)

Joeb454
March 17th, 2009, 07:38 PM
i just want email address. give me and wobi the email address now. for those who don't want it, fine. but me and wobi want it. gimme.

Seriously....


If you continue down this path, you're making it more and more likely that you well NEVER get an @ubuntu.com email address.

You shouldn't actively seek the recognition in the community, by all means aspire to help develop and contribute to Ubuntu in various ways, but do it for the right reasons, not just because you want an email address

Joeb454
March 17th, 2009, 07:43 PM
After a discussion amongst staff - Thread closed.

We feel no more can come of this, and it's just going to start going round in circles.

By all means feel free to make a case in the Resolution Center if you feel otherwise, but we feel it's run it's course :)

sdennie
March 18th, 2009, 01:07 AM
Thread temporarily re-opened so that a member of the membership board can respond. It will be re-closed after his response but, I think it's important for him to contribute his thoughts to the discussion.

Vorian
March 18th, 2009, 01:10 AM
Thanks to the staff for letting me put this last bit in.

Ubuntu Membership is a big deal. If you would like an @ubuntu.com email address - you can have one! It just takes a little bit of time and commitment.

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Membership

This ( ^ ) wiki page describes how the membership process works. Once you have a sustained trackrecord of contributions to the Ubuntu Project, you may apply for membership. ( I promise the Membership Boards are very nice :twisted: )

I know that Ubuntu would love to have thousands of people with @ubuntu.com email addresses.

If you have any questions about this process, please feel free to send me a private message - or you can find me on irc.freenode.net (my nick is vorian - go figure)

Thanks and good luck!

:popcorn: