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Primefalcon
March 15th, 2009, 06:49 AM
First off I'm a big fan of VI/VIM, I just recently started using gvim as my main graphical text editor and you know what I find it great, why isn't this powerful tool included by default in Ubuntu? It beats the hell out of gedit

vishzilla
March 15th, 2009, 11:35 AM
Gedit is included by default to cater a larger audience some who prefer simple things.

Joeb454
March 15th, 2009, 11:51 AM
Indeed I think (g)Vim may be a little too complex for new users. They have enough changes to get used to, let alone having their text editor demand that they [esc] :wq to save their documents ;)

Faolan84
March 15th, 2009, 06:26 PM
Indeed I think (g)Vim may be a little too complex for new users. They have enough changes to get used to, let alone having their text editor demand that they [esc] :wq to save their documents ;)

+1

However, I would like to see something the a vi input mode for Gnome applications in the same fashion that KDE does (even if it is a separate package). Although, I have to say reguardless, I still use gedit except on the occasion that i'm working on the CLI, then it's vi all the way.

Primefalcon
March 15th, 2009, 10:06 PM
gvim however is fully a fully graphical VIM, you can use those commands if you want however it has full based menu's to do a lot of that stuff too, even using the mouse to click to where you want....

it really simplifies the VIM client in my opinion for newbs, and if they want to start learning the shortcut keys to save them going through the menu, then thats their choice, and they'll be learning the more advanced features for the standard VIm at the same time so it'll promote more advanced usage while allowing people to do things the simple way.

for example you go to file menu and new or open to open a document, same as file save and such....

I'm not saying remove gedit but having this included would, in my opinion promote learning

Faolan84
March 15th, 2009, 10:26 PM
The problem with gvim is that it throws out all the options in the graphical menu and that isn't optimal for the average or the advanced user. On the other hand Cream, would actually make a better option for newbs because it is more traditional and all the vi options are still there: [esc] :wq

smartboyathome
March 15th, 2009, 10:36 PM
I love Gedit. I even use it on Arch (along with nano). I don't use Vim because I am too lazy to learn it. :P

Primefalcon
March 15th, 2009, 10:43 PM
The problem with gvim is that it throws out all the options in the graphical menu and that isn't optimal for the average or the advanced user. On the other hand Cream, would actually make a better option for newbs because it is more traditional and all the vi options are still there: [esc] :wq
I just downloaded cream, and from a first glance over I have to agree with you.... Unlike gedit apart from just being simple it actualy promotes learning


I love Gedit. I even use it on Arch (along with nano). I don't use Vim because I am too lazy to learn it. :P
Give that Cream or GVIM a go you may be surprised at how simple to use they are while providing powerful features

Faolan84
March 15th, 2009, 11:05 PM
Cream has always been my preference for that reason. A GUI is supposed to be simple and uncluttered. It's not that a believe in stripping away of features -la the early Gnome releases, I just believe those features should be well placed (like in KDE and recent Gnome releases).

However, when it comes to vi there isn't a simple solution to creating a GUI because it is designed with the terminal in mind. I've alway though Cream gave the best of both worlds because it doesn't hide too much and everything is better placed than in gvim.

Although I'd still love to see an input method for gedit that would implement at least basic vi functionality.

Primefalcon
March 16th, 2009, 01:06 AM
Cream has always been my preference for that reason. A GUI is supposed to be simple and uncluttered. It's not that a believe in stripping away of features -la the early Gnome releases, I just believe those features should be well placed (like in KDE and recent Gnome releases).

However, when it comes to vi there isn't a simple solution to creating a GUI because it is designed with the terminal in mind. I've alway though Cream gave the best of both worlds because it doesn't hide too much and everything is better placed than in gvim.

Although I'd still love to see an input method for gedit that would implement at least basic vi functionality.
So would I, Gedit is too simplified in my opinion TBH

Faolan84
March 16th, 2009, 01:50 AM
So would I, Gedit is too simplified in my opinion TBH

If you think it is simplified now, you should have been there when 2.0 came out. From then up until 2.16 or so Gedit was basically a glorified MS Notepad. It was like they neutered a kitten with a shot-gun. That was the bad old days for Gnome, when I used KDE.

Now get off my lawn! :P

juanmoreno92
March 16th, 2009, 02:34 AM
If you think it is simplified now, you should have been there when 2.0 came out. From then up until 2.16 or so Gedit was basically a glorified MS Notepad. It was like they neutered a kitten with a shot-gun. That was the bad old days for Gnome, when I used KDE.

Now get off my lawn! :P

:lolflag::lolflag: I give you 2 for the kitten joke. GVIM introduced me to vi in a understandable way. When I went to install arch I had some of the keystrokes already memorized that I chose vi as the default editor instead of nano.

Primefalcon
March 16th, 2009, 03:01 AM
If you think it is simplified now, you should have been there when 2.0 came out. From then up until 2.16 or so Gedit was basically a glorified MS Notepad. It was like they neutered a kitten with a shot-gun. That was the bad old days for Gnome, when I used KDE.

Now get off my lawn! :P
hehe I'll give you double points for that myself, I think personaly I'll stick with gvim/vim myself and probably recommend new comers to the cream that you mentioned.

I like simplifying stuff for newbies, but making it so simple that they won't learn more advanced stuff at all is kinda defeating the point..

That one thing I love about Ubuntu with all the gui's its making stuff simple but it's not going at an effort to hide everything from you, so you start off simple but are learning anyhow...