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Bullfrog110MB
February 14th, 2009, 04:48 AM
Okay, so I have checked Google and used the search on this website, the problem is none of the results I get are clear enough for a cynic like me.

My question is,

I have an AMD64 processor so I figure the AMD64 version of Ubuntu is correct for me, right?
I also have an old Compaq desktop with some sort of Intel processor. I'm not around to check what type of Intel it is. So I'm also downloading Ubuntu i386, will this work?

Will my AMD64 work with AMD64 Ubuntu?
Will my Intel (not sure what type) work with i386 Ubuntu?

Also, I am downloading Fedora 10 i686... hoping it will work on my Compaq tower? Just as dual boot.

I just need a clarification also of what i386, i686, etc means...

By the way, I checked the Compaq, it is:

Processor Intel Celeron 2.6 GHz
Installed Memory 512 MB (DDR SDRAM)
Operating System What is "Operating System"?
Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
Recommended Use Home Use
Processor
Processor Type What is "Processor Type"?
Intel Celeron
Processor Speed What is "Processor Speed"?
2.6 GHz
Processor Manufacturer Intel
Memory
RAM Technology DDR SDRAM
Installed RAM What is "Installed RAM"?
512 MB
Max Supported RAM 1 GB
Installed Cache Memory 128 KB
Hard Drive
Hard Drive Capacity What is "Hard Drive Capacity"?
120 GB

gletob
February 14th, 2009, 04:51 AM
Wikipedia is very useful
i386 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I386)

i686 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_P6_(microarchitecture))

AMD64/Intel 64 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMD64)

By the way your celeron is at least a 686 (some of the celeron family can actually handle AMD64) could you tell me which celeron it is? (the little intel sticker that came on the computer) Example: Celeron M, D

Bullfrog110MB
February 14th, 2009, 04:59 AM
Sorry, no sticker... :P

Here is the link to the product though:

http://www4.shopping.com/xPF-Compaq-Compaq-Presario-S4200nx-Desktop-Pc-

Hospadar
February 14th, 2009, 05:18 AM
Basically this is how it goes:
Just about any remotely modern (mid-90's ish) computer will use the "x86" version, 386, 686, are all the same in this regard.
Any 64 bit processor can run amd64, this means any amd 64 bit processor, or any new-ish intel, I believe anything celeron D or later, and all the core 2's, and some others. That said, 64 bit processors can also run 32 bit (x86) versions as well. If you arn't sure, you can just use the 32 bit edition. The average user will never notice the difference (unless you need extreme floating point precision?).

The difference between the two is the set of instructions that can be fed to the cpu. the 64 bit processors/os's have additional instructions that allow for certain things, when you run a 32 bit os, you just don't use those instructions, which in normal use, is just fine, unless you do huge scientific number crunching

Bullfrog110MB
February 14th, 2009, 06:21 AM
Thank you SO much for your reply, and may I just say, I am now an Ubuntu user!

I love Ubuntu, and am dual booting Fedora, but I also use Vista on my laptop... eek.

My desktop is now a linux box!
and she runs great.

egalvan
February 14th, 2009, 07:19 AM
Basically this is how it goes:
Just about any remotely modern (mid-90's ish) computer will use the "x86" version, 386, 686, are all the same in this regard.

Unless it's an Apple running the Motorola or PowerPC architecture.
Or DEC or HP running the RISC architecture....
And how about the Silicon Graphics stuff (SGI)? :lolflag:
(sorry, I couldn't help myself, I had to put those in! :))
After all, some of this stuff is available for a song on eBay,
or CraigsList, or you local recyclers.


Any 64 bit processor can run amd64, this means any amd 64 bit processor, or any new-ish intel, anything celeron D or later, and all the core 2's, and some others. That said, 64 bit processors can also run 32 bit (x86) versions as well. If you arn't sure, you can just use the 32 bit edition. The average user will never notice the difference (unless you need extreme floating point precision?).

The difference between the two is the set of instructions that can be fed to the cpu. the 64 bit processors/os's have additional instructions that allow for certain things, when you run a 32 bit os, you just don't use those instructions, which in normal use, is just fine, unless you do huge scientific number crunching

And a few other minor differences, most of no consequence as you stated....except for memory size...
What with the price of RAM dropping so far, some folks (like me :) )
stock up on RAM (8GB for $64, could you "just say no"?).

The DESKTOP 32bit is limited to 4GB.
The SERVER 32bit is limited to 64GB (PAE enabled).
(the server also has a bit better SMP support)

If you don't want or need more than 4GB, all is fine.
If you lust after more, just use the Server install,
then use apt-get to install the DE of your choice (Gnome, KDE, XFCE)
Instant penguin lust...
Don't you just love the CHOICES that *nix give us?!

Bullfrog110MB
February 14th, 2009, 10:02 PM
Haha, I'm replying to this thread on Ubuntu!!!

:):):)