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View Full Version : [ubuntu] Build it and install ubuntu yourself



weverjames
January 7th, 2009, 10:01 PM
I just want to give testimony that the sager NP7350 (the new gazelle value) works with ubuntu 8.10.
The installation process in the laptop is just: put the ubuntu cd in the cd room, and restart the laptop. Ubuntu will boot and you just have to follow ubuntu installer steps.
It recognizes the video card, the wireless card and it has audio OUT OF THE BOX! I mean, even before installing any updates. It is a worries-free process.
If you want to save some money, instead of buying brand laptops/pcs, you can do your search in ubuntu forum/google about the different components (video card, wireless card, sound). Then you search for laptops that are sold without OS (www.xoticpc.com) and buy it with the components that are reported to work with ubuntu.
The laptop itself is beautiful. The only thing is that the top of the laptop is hard plastic and no aluminium. I do not know if it is a real drawback. I don'tthink that this is a deal braker.

jbelmonte
January 7th, 2009, 10:55 PM
No Thanks.

I like the fact that System 76 laptops:
a. come preconfigured with Ubuntu
b. come with a custom driver to make sure everything works optimally
c. come with incredible support including this dedicated forum.

My time is valuable. I don't want to do another install of Ubuntu. I don't want to hunt down drivers and fixes for things that may not work. I don't want to fight with the hardware vendor because they claim a hardware problem is an Ubuntu problem. I may save some money up front, but it will cost me a lot more in the long run. Been there; done that. For me System 76 is the way to go.

OldDirtyTurtle
January 7th, 2009, 11:49 PM
Yeah, I looked at that route before buying my ServalPro.

For me personally, buying the customer support, driver development, and upstream improvements to Ubuntu was well worth it. I liked the idea of supporting what Sys76 does.

It's a personal choice. I totally understand both sides - but my choice was to pay a bit more and I'm really happy with that choice.

Spr0k3t
January 8th, 2009, 04:29 AM
For me personally, buying the customer support, driver development, and upstream improvements to Ubuntu was well worth it. I liked the idea of supporting what Sys76 does.

When I priced my DARU3 against the other Clevo clones, the price through System76 was cheaper regardless of which company I looked at. However, I would have paid a bit extra just for knowing some of the cost goes for further development and upstream improvements. Not to mention, the customer service has been nothing shy of fantastic.

jdb
January 8th, 2009, 06:22 PM
Yeah, I looked at that route before buying my ServalPro.

For me personally, buying the customer support, driver development, and upstream improvements to Ubuntu was well worth it. I liked the idea of supporting what Sys76 does.

It's a personal choice. I totally understand both sides - but my choice was to pay a bit more and I'm really happy with that choice.

+1

jdb

weverjames
January 9th, 2009, 04:01 PM
I could not afford to pay 350 dollars more to support system 76 (do the exercise yourself).
I had limited budget. So I took "the risk" and it paid well. I realize how good is ubuntu itself that m future systems will be barebone systems compatible with ubuntu.
With the price difference I found that the worse case scenario would be to have to install windows if ubuntu did not work, but it did.
My specifications:
intel core duo P9500
intel SSD of 80 GB
4 GIG RAM.
the standard video card and audio for the model(sager NP 7350)
thanks

OldDirtyTurtle
January 9th, 2009, 06:13 PM
<snip>
I had limited budget. So I took "the risk" and it paid well. I realize how good is ubuntu itself that m future systems will be barebone systems compatible with ubuntu.
<snip>

This illustrates my point and also illustrates the beauty of Ubuntu. And for the record, I don't really see it as a risk, just a personal route to take.

Where else but in the world of open-source computing can you even make this decision based on your wallet or your personal preferences and goals. Feel like installing on a bare bones box? Go for it! Feel like getting a preinstalled Ubuntu machine? You can easily do that too! 8)

You made the choice based on your own needs. So did I. And we're both happy about it. One of these days I'll be building up another desktop computer for home use, and I won't be quite so new to Linux as I am now. I'll most likely go from scratch like you (and most other folks). This time, I weighed my options and went the Sys76 route.

former_warper
January 10th, 2009, 04:54 PM
I just got my Serval Pro 28 hours ago.

I've slept 1 hour since.

This thing is incredible. The wuxga screen is awesome. The HDMI and DVI both work and the output to my HD projector made me cry. What I've been missing!

The Serval is based on the Clevo M860TU/M865TU. This is one of the top 15.4 machines you'll find this year, and powers Sagers, XoticPC and Eurocom systems, to name a few. I suppose you *could* buy one of them and install your own Linux distro, but why bother? As mentioned, it comes already configured and with the System76 driver. Plus, the folks at System76 were tremendous when I made my purchase. And, most important of all, I got a better deal from them than I would've from anyone else.

I'll be a return System76 customer.

If you want the Clevo (and who wouldn't? It's an awesome machine) - and you want the benefits of FOSS, get the Serval Pro from System76. That is my recommendation, and I'll say it to anyone who listens.

Mirai_-_
January 10th, 2009, 06:30 PM
OldDirtyTurtle, I don't see how the the FOSS route makes the arbitrariness of picking your system any different from the experience with proprietary software.

Even with MS Windows, for instance, you could build your system and then install a store bought Windows package for cheaper than a pre packaged machine, and with better performance.

OldDirtyTurtle
January 11th, 2009, 06:57 PM
Even with MS Windows, for instance, you could build your system and then install a store bought Windows package for cheaper than a pre packaged machine, and with better performance.

Yeah, you're right. You can add open-source software and get mroe flexibility and less expenditures than with proprietary add-ons. I went this route for years. It just feels easier to me on a Linux platform. That's all.

weverjames
January 15th, 2009, 03:41 AM
By the way, the sager laptops come with an excellent WARRANTY and SUPPORT:
Warranty
3 Year Labor 1 Year Parts Sager Warranty (2 Year Extra Labor Warranty through Xotic PC)
Lifetime 24/7 Toll Free Domestic Technical support.
Highly recommended.

thomasaaron
January 15th, 2009, 07:50 PM
Sorry, guys. This is a test message.

(If a moderator wants to delete it, that's fine.) It keeps showing that James Weaver was the last poster, and it always shows up as new.

I'm just checking to see if my posting to it might auto-magically fix it somehow.

EDIT...

That seems to have fixed it.

weverjames
January 20th, 2009, 04:21 AM
Ubuntu with sager (with my specifications):
wireless works
volume control works
special function works
suspend/hybernate works
finger print have not try, do not need it really
webcam, same

The laptop gets hot in the bottom, it may burn your lap.